Portfolio Essay #2.pdf - Sylvia Sheng Ms Davis English Period 2 Portfolio Essay#2 One of the biggest concerns nowadays is whether Americans should

Portfolio Essay #2.pdf - Sylvia Sheng Ms Davis English...

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Unformatted text preview: Sylvia​ ​Sheng Ms.​ ​Davis English​ ​Period​ ​2 10/25/2017 Portfolio​ ​Essay​ ​#2 One​ ​of​ ​the​ ​biggest​ ​concerns​ ​nowadays​ ​is​ ​whether​ ​Americans​ ​should​ ​consume​ ​more healthy​ ​green​ ​food​ ​or​ ​should​ ​they​ ​follow​ ​the​ ​traditional​ ​eating​ ​habit​ ​of​ ​consuming​ ​meat​ ​and types​ ​of​ ​processed​ ​products​ ​as​ ​their​ ​primary​ ​diet.​ ​While​ ​three​ ​articles​ ​all​ ​acknowledge​ ​the​ ​side effects​ ​of​ ​having​ ​processed,​ ​sugar-laden​ ​food,​ ​they​ ​each​ ​approach​ ​this​ ​problem​ ​with​ ​different measures.​ ​While​ ​the​ ​author​ ​of​ ​Bad​ ​Food?​ ​Tax​ ​it,​ ​and​ ​Subsidize​ ​Vegetables​​ ​addresses​ ​the problem​ ​by​ ​imposing​ ​taxes​ ​on​ ​bad​ ​food,​ ​the​ ​article​ ​Attacking​ ​the​ ​Obesity​ ​Epidemic​ ​by​ ​First Figuring​ ​Out​ ​Its​ ​Cause​​ ​takes​ ​a​ ​step​ ​further,​ ​advocating​ ​healthy​ ​dietary​ ​options​ ​through​ ​education for​ ​our​ ​younger​ ​generation.​ ​The​ ​author​ ​of​ ​No​ ​Lunch​ ​Left​ ​Behind​,​ ​on​ ​the​ ​other​ ​hand,​ ​focuses solely​ ​on​ ​students​ ​and​ ​their​ ​lunch​ ​program,​ ​suggesting​ ​a​ ​more​ ​collective​ ​cooperation​ ​among Congress,​ ​the​ ​USDA​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Education​ ​Department. In​ ​Bad​ ​Food?​ ​Tax​ ​it,​ ​and​ ​Subsidize​ ​Vegetables​,​ ​Mark​ ​Bittman​ ​utilizes​ ​extensive statistical​ ​information​ ​to​ ​demonstrate​ ​the​ ​benefit​ ​of​ ​imposing​ ​taxes​ ​on​ ​unhealthy​ ​food.​ ​He​ ​deems that​ ​it​ ​is​ ​the​ ​most​ ​efficient​ ​solution​ ​to​ ​disencourage​ ​the​ ​current​ ​trend​ ​of​ ​consuming​ ​bad​ ​food. Given​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​that​ ​the​ ​food​ ​industry​ ​is​ ​greatly​ ​propelled​ ​by​ ​profit,​ ​Bittman​ ​argues​ ​that​ ​it​ ​is​ ​the U.S.​ ​government’s​ ​responsibility​ ​to​ ​conduct​ ​stricter​ ​regulations.​ ​However,​ ​in​ ​Attacking​ ​the Obesity​ ​Epidemic​ ​by​ ​First​ ​Figuring​ ​Out​ ​Its​ ​Cause​,​ ​Jane​ ​E.​ ​Brody​ ​also​ ​proposes​ ​that​ ​the​ ​big​ ​food corporations​ ​have​ ​to​ ​reduce​ ​“junk​ ​food”​ ​advertisements​ ​to​ ​children​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​presenting​ ​a​ ​“more obvious​ ​nutrition​ ​labeling”.​ ​Despite​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​that​ ​both​ ​Bittman​ ​and​ ​Brody​ ​are​ ​both​ ​positive​ ​about imposing​ ​taxes​ ​on​ ​unhealthy​ ​food,​ ​Brody​ ​suggests​ ​that​ ​a​ ​more​ ​comprehensive​ ​approach​ ​should be​ ​adopted​ ​instead​ ​of​ ​solely​ ​depending​ ​upon​ ​taxations. Moreover,​ ​Brody​ ​believes​ ​that​ ​school-based​ ​program​ ​should​ ​also​ ​be​ ​included​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to “encourage​ ​healthier​ ​eating​ ​and​ ​exercise​ ​habits​ ​and​ ​to​ ​reduce​ ​television​ ​watching”​ ​among students.​ ​This​ ​proposal​ ​was​ ​in​ ​accordance​ ​with​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​proposed​ ​in​ ​No​ ​Lunch​ ​Left​ ​Behind​.​ ​In No​ ​Lunch​ ​Left​ ​Behind​​ ​article,​ ​Alice​ ​Waters​ ​and​ ​Katrina​ ​Heron​ ​believe​ ​that​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​most important​ ​actions​ ​that​ ​the​ ​Department​ ​of​ ​Education​ ​should​ ​undertake,​ ​is​ ​a​ ​role​ ​in​ ​educating students​ ​as​ ​to​ ​what​ ​constitutes​ ​better​ ​eating​ ​habits.​ ​Waters​ ​and​ ​Katrina​ ​put​ ​their​ ​emphasis​ ​on​ ​the food​ ​programs​ ​in​ ​school.​ ​In​ ​their​ ​opinion,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​insufficient​ ​for​ ​schools​ ​to​ ​prepare​ ​a​ ​healthy,​ ​fresh lunch​ ​with​ ​only​ ​$9​ ​billion​ ​towards​ ​the​ ​program​ ​costs.​ ​In​ ​order​ ​to​ ​solve​ ​this​ ​issue,​ ​they​ ​suggest that​ ​Congress​ ​should​ ​invest​ ​three​ ​times​ ​as​ ​much​ ​as​ ​they​ ​are​ ​spending​ ​now​ ​in​ ​the​ ​school​ ​lunch program​ ​by​ ​“taking​ ​up​ ​the​ ​Child​ ​Nutrition​ ​and​ ​Women​ ​Infants​ ​and​ ​Children​ ​Reauthorization Act”. Another​ ​difference​ ​among​ ​these​ ​three​ ​articles​ ​is​ ​that​ ​Bad​ ​Food?​ ​Tax​ ​it,​ ​and​ ​Subsidize Vegetables​​ ​and​ ​No​ ​Lunch​ ​Left​ ​Behind​​ ​evaluate​ ​the​ ​issue​ ​of​ ​consuming​ ​bad​ ​food​ ​based​ ​upon​ ​the current​ ​situation​ ​whereas​ ​Attacking​ ​the​ ​Obesity​ ​Epidemic​ ​by​ ​First​ ​Figuring​ ​Out​ ​Its​ ​Cause​​ ​tackles this​ ​issue​ ​retrospectively​ ​by​ ​examining​ ​the​ ​diet​ ​history​ ​of​ ​American​ ​people.​ ​Rather​ ​than​ ​directly pointing​ ​out​ ​the​ ​eating​ ​habit​ ​issues​ ​that​ ​are​ ​currently​ ​plaguing​ ​American​ ​society​ ​as​ ​Bittman​ ​and Waters​ ​do,​ ​Brody​ ​attempts​ ​to​ ​discover​ ​the​ ​cause​ ​of​ ​it. In​ ​her​ ​article,​ ​she​ ​portrays​ ​how​ ​women​ ​and​ ​technology’s​ ​roles​ ​have​ ​changed​ ​in​ ​society over​ ​the​ ​past​ ​century.​ ​The​ ​technology,​ ​according​ ​to​ ​Brody,​ ​was​ ​advanced​ ​enough​ ​to​ ​not​ ​only create​ ​“labor-saving​ ​devices​ ​and​ ​automobiles”,​ ​but​ ​it​ ​could​ ​also​ ​produce​ ​“convenience​ ​food... rich​ ​in​ ​sugar,​ ​salt​ ​and​ ​fat”​ ​on​ ​a​ ​large​ ​scale.​ ​Moreover,​ ​Brody​ ​points​ ​out​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​that​ ​since​ ​women were​ ​more​ ​liberated​ ​and​ ​gained​ ​more​ ​equality,​ ​they​ ​were​ ​more​ ​likely​ ​to​ ​have​ ​a​ ​job​ ​other​ ​than​ ​just being​ ​a​ ​housewife.​ ​The​ ​lack​ ​of​ ​time​ ​for​ ​women​ ​to​ ​prepare​ ​meals​ ​at​ ​home,​ ​to​ ​some​ ​extent, contributed​ ​to​ ​the​ ​popularity​ ​of​ ​processed​ ​food.​ ​ ​In​ ​these​ ​cases,​ ​she​ ​argues​ ​that​ ​both​ ​technology and​ ​social​ ​change​ ​have​ ​encouraged​ ​people​ ​to​ ​exercise​ ​less​ ​while​ ​eat​ ​more​ ​conveniently.​ ​ ​This change​ ​in​ ​social​ ​dynamic​ ​has​ ​made​ ​the​ ​foundation​ ​of​ ​America's​ ​current​ ​unhealthy​ ​eating​ ​culture. With​ ​this​ ​realization​ ​in​ ​mind,​ ​instead​ ​of​ ​solely​ ​using​ ​taxes​ ​and​ ​subsidies​ ​as​ ​means​ ​of​ ​incentives for​ ​the​ ​general​ ​public,​ ​Brody’s​ ​additional​ ​proposal​ ​of​ ​starting​ ​school​ ​based​ ​programs ​not​ ​only wants​ ​to​ ​solve​ ​the​ ​problem​ ​of​ ​eating​ ​unhealthy​ ​food,​ ​but​ ​more​ ​importantly,​ ​she​ ​implies​ ​that​ ​it​ ​is a​ ​food​ ​culture​ ​that​ ​we​ ​should​ ​be​ ​working​ ​hard​ ​to​ ​break.​ ​In​ ​order​ ​to​ ​reverse​ ​this​ ​culture,​ ​the government​ ​should​ ​put​ ​more​ ​focuse​ ​on​ ​the​ ​younger​ ​generation​ ​in​ ​hope​ ​that​ ​their​ ​education would​ ​change​ ​their​ ​stereotype​ ​about​ ​“green​ ​and​ ​healthy​ ​food”​ ​and​ ​start​ ​a​ ​brand​ ​new​ ​eating​ ​habit. These​ ​three​ ​articles​ ​all​ ​have​ ​the​ ​same​ ​consent​ ​that​ ​the​ ​government​ ​should​ ​play​ ​a​ ​key​ ​role in​ ​preventing​ ​Americans​ ​from​ ​consuming​ ​unhealthy​ ​food.​ ​However,​ ​they​ ​do​ ​have​ ​different measures​ ​and​ ​evaluations​ ​regarding​ ​this​ ​issue.​ ​While​ ​Brittman​ ​is​ ​a​ ​firm​ ​advocator​ ​for​ ​taxing unhealthy​ ​food​ ​and​ ​subsidising​ ​healthier​ ​food​ ​choices​ ​as​ ​a​ ​strong​ ​incentive,​ ​Brody​ ​on​ ​the​ ​other hand,​ ​thinks​ ​that​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​diminish​ ​such​ ​long-established​ ​habits,​ ​education​ ​and​ ​cooperation with​ ​the​ ​food​ ​industry​ ​are​ ​also​ ​warranted.​ ​Last​ ​but​ ​not​ ​least,​ ​Waters​ ​and​ ​Katrina,​ ​in​ ​their​ ​article No​ ​Lunch​ ​Left​ ​Behind​,​ ​believe​ ​that​ ​the​ ​U.S.​ ​government​ ​should​ ​pass​ ​laws​ ​and​ ​improve​ ​school lunch​ ​programs​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​cope​ ​with​ ​the​ ​rise​ ​in​ ​childhood​ ​diabetes,​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​other​ ​health disorders​ ​related​ ​to​ ​poor​ ​dietary​ ​choices. ...
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