PSYC212_lecture5_2018.pptx

PSYC212_lecture5_2018.pptx - LECTURE 4 LIGHT AND THE...

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LECTURE 4 – LIGHT AND THE EYE (continued)
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SCHEDULE: Date Week Topic Lecture # Reading* Review sessions** Exam viewing TA 9-Jan 1 Syllabus and introduction 1 Chapter 1 NA 11-Jan Psychophysics 2 Chapter 1 Gabrielle 16-Jan 2 Elements of neurophysiology 3 Chapter 1 Gabrielle 18-Jan Vision 1: light and the eye 4 Chapter 2 Zoey 23-Jan 3 Vision 2: primary visual cortex 5 Chapter 3 Zoey 25-Jan Vision 3: Perceiving objects 1 6 Chapter 4 Zoey 30-Jan 4 Vision 4: Perceiving objects 2 7 Chapter 4 Zoey 1-Feb Vision 5: Perceiving color 8 Chapter 5 Zoey 6-Feb 5 Vision 6: Space and binocular vision 9 Chapter 6 Taylor 8-Feb Vision 7: Perceiving movement 10 Chapter 8 Fri Feb 9: lectures 2-8 Taylor 13-Feb 6 Attention and awareness 1 11 Chapter 7 Mon Feb 12: lectures 2-8 Todd 15-Feb Midterm 1 (lectures 2-8) 20-Feb 7 Attention and awareness 2 12 Chapter 7 TBA Todd 22-Feb Audition 1: Sound and hearing 13 Chapter 9 Anna 27-Feb 8 Audition 2: Auditory scene analysis 14 Chapter 10 Anna 1-Mar Audition 3: Speech 15 Chapter 11 Anna 6-Mar 9 Reading Break 8-Mar Fri Mar 9: lectures 9-15 13-Mar 10 Audition 4: Music 16 Chapter 11 Mon Mar 12: lectures 9-15 Anna 15-Mar Midterm 2 (lectures 9-15) 20-Mar 11 Time perception 17 NA Dasha 22-Mar Vestibular system 18 Chapter 12 Taylor 27-Mar 12 Touch 19 Chapter 13 TBA Todd 29-Mar Pain 20 Chapter 13 Todd 3-Apr Cross-modal plasticity (Hocine Slimani) 21 NA Dasha
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What is the first cell type light is most likely to encounter as it enters the eye and moves towards the back of the eye? A. Photoreceptor B. Bipolar cell C. Amacrine cell D. Photopigment E. Ganglion cell EXAMPLE OF QUESTIONS The transparent “window” on the outer part of the eye that allows light into the eyeball is called the a. pupil. b. iris. c. lens. d. retina. e. cornea.
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The human eye is made up of various parts: Cornea: The transparent “window” into the eyeball. Aqueous humor: The watery fluid in the anterior chamber. Crystalline lens: The lens inside the eye, which focuses light onto the back of the eye. Pupil: The dark circular opening at the center of the iris in the eye, where light enters the eye. The eye – general anatomy
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Photoreceptors : - Photoreceptors are located at he back of the retina, close to the pigment epithelium, which provides vital nutrients to the photoreceptors. The foremost layers of the retina are transparent. - Photoreceptors transduce light energy into neural energy. The retina
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EXAMPLE OF QUESTIONS Noise Square+noise Which area corresponds to correct rejections? a. top-lef b. top-right c. bottom-lef d. bottom-right e. None of these Looks like there is a square Looks like there is a square Looks like there is a square Looks like there is a square
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LECTURE 4 – LIGHT AND THE EYE 1. A little light physics 2. The eye – general anatomy 3. The retina 4. Transduction of light by photoreceptors 5. Receptive fields and lateral inhibition 6. Dark and light adaptation 7. Visual acuity
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Photoactivation: when a photon is absorbed by an opsin, it transfers its energy to the chromophore portion of the visual pigment molecule.
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