MEA 130 chapter 1 notes

MEA 130 chapter 1 notes - 1 MEA 130 Introduction to Weather...

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MEA 130 Introduction to Weather and Climate Some people are weather wise. .. ...but most are otherwise! 1
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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Atmosphere Meteorology, Weather and Climate Meteorology: meteorology is derived from the Greek word “meteoros” which means: anything that fell from or was seen high in the sky. Weather : Climate : Statistics : Means (≥ 30 years of data) Extremes (period of record) Climate is what you expect……weather is what you get These specific or mean conditions are defined by six major elements : - the degree of hotness or coldness [ o Fahrenheit, o Celsius, Kelvin] - a measure of water content - relative humidity [ %] - dewpoint [ o F, o C, K] - visible mass of suspended water droplets and/or ice crystals 2
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[cloud type, amount and height] - any form of water falling to the surface [precipitation type and amount] - the weight of the air above an area [ inches of mercury, millibars] - movement of the air - speed [mph, knots, m/s] - direction [quadrants, degrees] At this point we will examine several sections from Chapter 12, entitled: Weather Analysis and Forecasting Weather Analysis Gathering Data Surface Observations Measurements of these six major elements (as well as others) are collected hourly by the National Weather Service (NWS) at nearly a thousand Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) sites in the United States (Fig. 1.7, 12.4). Observations Aloft Measurements of four of these elements (temp., moisture, press. and wind) are collected by balloon-borne instrument packages called: which are launched twice daily at 92 stations in the U.S. (Fig. 1.8b). This data can then be disseminated Nationwide and displayed using a variety of plots and maps including the: 3
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The word synoptic is derived from the Greek words “syn” which means together and “optikos” which means seen……….seen together. For this class we will utilize a somewhat simplified station model: We will also use: Statistics of the data can then compiled to develop a local climatology: 4
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Examples: January 9 @ RDU Mean (30 years) Max Temp: Min Temp: Extreme (POR) Max Temp: Min Temp: 5
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Atmospheric Hazards: Assault by the Elements
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MEA 130 chapter 1 notes - 1 MEA 130 Introduction to Weather...

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