Wk4Assgn.docx - Running head ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT Asthma and Stepwise Management Walden University Advanced Pharmacology NURS 6521 1 ASTHMA

Wk4Assgn.docx - Running head ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 7 pages.

Running head: ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT 1 Asthma and Stepwise Management Walden University Advanced Pharmacology NURS 6521
Image of page 1
ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT 2 Asthma and Stepwise Management Asthma is referred to as a condition in which the airways narrow and swell, and an excess production of mucus is seen (Arcangelo, Peterson, Wilbur, & Reinhold, 2017). These symptoms cause difficulty breathing, create coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath (Arcangelo et al., 2017). Some people experience minor symptoms, others can experience major problems that are life-threatening and may interfere with activities of daily living. Asthma is not curable, however, the symptoms can be controlled. Working with the patient’s provider to track signs and symptoms is key to adjusting the treatment plan accordingly. Some signs and symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, chest tightness or pain, difficulty sleeping due to shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing (Arcangelo et al., 2017). The goal of this paper is to describe long-term control and quick-relief treatment options for asthma patients. A description of the impact these drugs might have on patients, a review of the stepwise approach to asthma treatment and management. Finally, to discuss how stepwise management assists health care providers and patients in gaining and maintaining control of asthma. Treatment Options Asthma medications and doses are determined by the patient’s age, symptoms, the severity of asthma and the medication side effects (Mayo Clinic, 2017). Long-term control medications are treatments that are to be taken on a regular basis to help control chronic symptoms and prevent attacks (Arcangelo et al., 2017). Some long-term treatment options include inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), leukotriene modifiers, long-acting beta-agonists (LABA), theophylline, and combination inhalers that contain both a corticosteroid and a LABA (Mayo Clinic, 2017). Quick-relief medications are taken as needed for rapid, short-term relief of symptoms, and mostly used to prevent and treat an asthma attack (Arcangelo et al., 2017).
Image of page 2
ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT 3 Quick-relief treatment options include short-acting beta agonists (SABA) like Albuterol, Atrovent, oral and intravenous (IV) corticosteroids for serious asthma attacks.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Fall '13

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture