Attractive Forces Handout

Attractive Forces - ELECTRONEGATIVITY(EN It is the tendency of an atom to pull the electrons more toward itself when chemically bonded with another

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ELECTRONEGATIVITY (EN): It is the tendency of an atom to pull the electrons more toward itself when chemically bonded with another atom. Fluorine, F, is the most electronegative element of the periodic table. TYPES OF CHEMICAL BONDS: IONIC BONDS: Chemical bonds that occur between two elements with high electronegativity (EN) difference. One element looses electron(s) and becomes positively charged (cation) while the other element gains electron(s) and becomes negatively charged (anion). In general, the two elements involved in ionic bonding are a metal and a non-metal, examples, Na + and Cl - ; Ca 2+ and O 2- ; etc… COVALENT BONDS: Chemical bonds that form by the sharing of one or more electron pairs between two atoms. They occur between two elements with no or small EN difference. In general, the two elements involved in covalent bonding are two non- metals. We distinguish between two types of covalent bonds: Pure covalent bond (non-polar covalent bond): It occurs between two elements with
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course CH 314 taught by Professor Fakhreddine during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Attractive Forces - ELECTRONEGATIVITY(EN It is the tendency of an atom to pull the electrons more toward itself when chemically bonded with another

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