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1. Are the atoms and basic molecules that compose living things different from the molecules that make up nonliving things? where were the atoms in living things formed? The atoms and basic molecules that compose life are no different from the molecules in nonliving materials. As youll read in chapter 13, a living thing is defined not by its composition but by its ability to manipulate energy. With the exception of hydrogen, all the atoms in living things were formed in stars. 2. Can scientific inquiry probe further back in time than the "big bang"? Time itself began with the big bang, so the concept of "before" is meaningless in discussing imagined events that preceded the big bang. 3. Chemical oceanographers study the ocean's dissolved solids and gases and their relationships to the geology and biology of the ocean as a whole. 4. Climate specialists investigate the ocean's role in Earth's changing climate. 5. condensation theory a theory based on the inference, explains how stars and planets are believed to form. 6. earth and its ocean formed as an indirect result of what? a supernova explosion 7. Europa Jupiter's moon 8. galaxy huge, rotating aggregation of stars, dust, gas, and other debris held together by gravity 9. How are the heaviest elements thought to be formed? Stars much more massive than the sun have shower but more interesting lives, which sometimes end in a cataclysmic expansion called a supernova. The explosion lasts only about 30 seconds, but in that short time the nuclear forces holding apart individual atomic nuclei are overcome and atoms heavier than iron are formed. The gold of your rings, the mercury in a thermometer, and the uranium in nuclear power plants were all created during such a brief and stupendous flash.
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