RESEARCH PAPER.docx - Makayla Soto Gabriel Muro ASTR 1 The Accuracy of Scientific Reporting in the Media Scientific studies reported on in the media are

RESEARCH PAPER.docx - Makayla Soto Gabriel Muro ASTR 1 The...

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Makayla Soto Gabriel Muro ASTR 1 The Accuracy of Scientific Reporting in the Media Scientific studies reported on in the media are often portrayed as having concrete absolutes in order to entice it’s viewers or readers into engaging with the material, while simultaneously increasing the study’s validity and relevancy to the media’s intended audience. Important factors such as sample size and duration can be disregarded unless they specifically support the reported on finding. This often leads to misconceptions between the general public and the scientific community. The nuances between published studies and the media that report on them can often be left to the interpretation of the journalist reporting on the study. This can lead to the misinterpretation of findings to make results seem more interesting or relevant to the intended demographic. While most layman will read an article from a reputable news source and consider its reporting valid, they will fail to read the study that accompanies the article due to confusing jargon and complexity. “The Most Mysterious Star in Our Galaxy” published by The Atlantic, is an example of one such media article that fails to accurately report the conclusion of the study “Where’s the Flux?”. The article leaves an open-to-interpretation viewpoint on a study with a clear conclusion.
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