Electoral College.2016.doc

Electoral College.2016.doc - ElectoralCollege...

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Electoral College Wikipedia   – peer reviewed and seriously condensed and edited for accuracy by Professor Fish Indirect Election Direct Election Article II Winner-Take-All Simple Majority Supermajority Absolute Majority Plurality  12 th  Amendment 23 rd  Amendment Electoral College Congressional District  Method The  Electoral College 1  consists of the electors appointed by each state who formally elect the President and Vice President  of the United States. Since 1964, there have been 538 electors in each presidential election. Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the  Constitution specifies how many electors each state is entitled to have and that each state's legislature decides how its electors are to  be chosen. U.S. territories are not represented in the Electoral College. The Electoral College is an example of an indirect election 2 , as  opposed to a direct election 3 . The voters of each state, and the District of Columbia, vote for electors to be the authorized  constitutional participants in a presidential election.  Article II, Section 1 describes the basics of the Electoral College.  However, much of this was changed with the Twelfth  Amendment. Presidential electors are selected on a state-by-state basis, as determined by the laws of each state. Generally (with  Maine and Nebraska being the exceptions), each state appoints its electors on a winner-take-all basis, based on the statewide popular  vote on Election Day. Although ballots list the names of the presidential candidates, voters within the 50 states and Washington, D.C.  actually choose electors for their state when they vote for President and Vice President. These presidential electors in turn cast  electoral votes for those two offices. Even though the aggregate national popular vote is calculated by state officials and media  organizations, the national popular vote is not the basis for electing a President or Vice President.
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