Bio Lab Report Catalase.docx

Bio Lab Report Catalase.docx - Catalase Reactivity with The...

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Catalase Reactivity with The Relation to Acidic pH Katelynn Ossege BIO 121 Lab Section 03 November 1, 2016 2:30 p.m. Lab Partner: Emily Tinta Professor Sarady-Andrews
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Introduction Enzymes are important to all living organisms. Enzymes are defined as, “Organic catalyst, normally a protein, that allows a reaction to speed up within a cell due to its particular shape” (Mader et al., 2016). Enzymes allow the synthetization or degradation of specific molecules at a faster rate with less energy consumption. An example of an enzyme is catalase. Catalase is an important enzyme because it allows for degradation of hydrogen peroxide without releasing free radicals, which is what would be produced if hydrogen peroxide broke down naturally (Shriner et al. 2005). Free radicals are harmful to the body because they cause the destabilization of electrons in surrounding molecules. It can cause a domino effect: instead of just surrounding molecules being affected, it can cause damage within an entire cell. This can lead to cancer and aging. With the help from catalase, hydrogen peroxide is reduced and oxidized at the same time, in the reaction (Kimborugh et al. 1997). By both reducing and oxidizing hydrogen peroxide at the same time, there is no formation of free radicals. The objective of this lab was to manipulate a factor and observe how it affects enzyme reactivity. Factors that allow enzymes to work more efficiently include concentration of the enzyme, temperature, pH level, among other things. Within this lab we focused on how pH of 3 will cause catalase activity to decrease. Materials and Methods First, 2 ml of distilled water were added to test tube #1 and #2. Next, 1 ml of pH 7 solution (made of distilled water) was added to test tube #1 and 1 ml of pH 3 solution (a combination of distilled water with hydrochloric acid) was added to the test tube #2. 1 ml of
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catalase at a pH of 7 were added to both test tubes, which were used as the negative controls in the experiment. The positive control was made by adding 1 ml of pH 7 solution with 2 ml of
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