Biomechanics EXAM

Biomechanics EXAM - Biomechanics: What makes it stable?...

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Biomechanics: What makes it stable? What movements (degrees of freedom) What causes abnormalities? With abnormalities what happens down the chain Lower Extremity – Hip: provide force transmission from pelvis to lower chain Stability - Large bones, large muscles (4), large ligament structure o Glute med contracts to keep hip stable when standing on one leg (trendelenburg) - Deep labrium/joint for head of femur to fit into Movement - Three degrees of freedom (six movements) o AB/AD, flex/exten, internal/external rotation - Arthokinematics: spin and glide (rotational) acetabulum too deep to allow rolling Alignment - Angle on Inclination (frontal plane): 125 degrees o More than 125 degrees: bow leg (varus at knee and valgus at hip, and thus toes out*pronate*) o Less than 125 degrees: knocked knee (valgus at knee and varus at hip, and thus toes in*supinate*) - Angle of anteversion (transverse plane): 12 degrees, anterior bend at head of femur to help keep leg straight o More than 12 degrees: excessive anteversion and causes toe in
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Biomechanics EXAM - Biomechanics: What makes it stable?...

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