Hooke - Hooke's Law Tommy Nguyen Abstract Introduction...

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Hooke’s Law Tommy Nguyen 10/23/07 Abstract Introduction: Hooke’s Law is very well known because it turns out to be a useful description of the behavior of springs made of steel, brass, and other commonly used metals and alloys over a fairly wide range of extensions or elongations of the springs. This law states that the elongation of a spring is proportional to the applied stretching force. The stretching on the force is then given by: F applied = k x where F applied is the force applied to the spring , and x is the elongation of the spring as measured from some equilibrium position. The elongation points in the direction of the applied force and its magnitude is equal to the change of length. The positive definite quantity k is called the spring constant. It is a measure of the stiffness of the spring. Theoretically, the period for the oscillating system is given by: T = 2 π ( M+(m/2) / k ) 1/2 where M is the total mass load in oscillation (weight hanger + masses), m is the mass of
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course PHY 101L taught by Professor None during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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Hooke - Hooke's Law Tommy Nguyen Abstract Introduction...

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