Heart Of Darkness Paper

Heart Of Darkness Paper - Atkins 1 Theidre Atkins...

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Atkins 1 Theidre Atkins Composition Professor Harbin November 20 th , 2006 Heart of Darkness: “The horror! The horror!” What Does It Mean? Imagine if you will an old man on his death bed. Surrounded by his friends and family, he has accepted death and is ready and willing to die. Right before he takes his last breath, he looks at all of his supporters and utters the phrase, “You all suck!” Though unexpected, his last words make him memorable and give individuals something to think about and question. Why would he use those words? What did he mean when he said it? In Joseph Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness , one of the main characters, Mr. Kurtz was faced with the prospect of dying. Before he took his final breath, he said breathlessly to Marlow, “The horror! The horror!” However, what does this mean? What was the horror that Kurtz was talking about? Though there are many different interpretations of what the “horror” is, some tend to agree that it could be Kurtz’s lament over facing his sins, his regret over losing his mistress and Intended, his sadness over leaving the Africans without leadership or his depression over the idea of colonialism. One interpretation of Kurtz’s last words was his realization that he was going to hell to pay for his sins. In the novel Kurtz did morally reprehensible things to get what he desired. As
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Atkins 2 the Russian told Marlow in his discussion of Kurtz, “He could be very terrible. You can’t judge Mr. Kurtz as you would an ordinary man. (56)” He instilled fear into the hearts of others (i.e. scaring the natives by displaying shrunken heads), cheated on his Intended with an African mistress, ordered the Africans to attack the ship with Marlow and the others aboard and stole ivory from the African people. In simple terms, he was unwavering authority that did whatever he wanted to get what he desired. Throughout the novel, he was seen as the man who was not afraid of anything, and even if he was afraid he never showed it. As Marlow stated in his description of Kurtz: He originated nothing, he could keep the routine going—that’s all. He was great by this little thing that it was impossible to tell what could control such a man. He never gave that secret away. Perhaps there was nothing
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course SOCI 1101 taught by Professor Beck during the Spring '08 term at UGA.

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Heart Of Darkness Paper - Atkins 1 Theidre Atkins...

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