SOV-OCC-39-41-UNEDITED.doc

SOV-OCC-39-41-UNEDITED.doc - NEIGHBOURS On the Eve of the...

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NEIGHBOURS On the Eve of the Holocaust Polish-Jewish Relations in Soviet-Occupied Eastern Poland, 1939–1941 Mark Paul PEFINA Press Toronto 2016
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Table of Contents Foreword Chapter One: Arrests, Executions and Deportations Chapter Two: Jews Greet the Soviet Invaders Chapter Three: Fifth Columnists and Armed Rebellions Chapter Four: The Fate of Polish Officers and Soldiers Chapter Five: The Persecution and Murder of Polish Policemen, Officials, Political Figures, Landowners, Clergymen, and Settlers Chapter Six: Anti-Polish and Anti-Christian Agitation, Vandalism and Looting Chapter Seven: A Few Short Weeks Was All That Was Needed to Leave a Mark Chapter Eight: A Smooth Transition Chapter Nine: Positions of Authority and Privilege Chapter Ten: Collaborators and Informers Chapter Eleven: Victims of Choice Chapter Twelve: An Atmosphere of Fanaticism Chapter Thirteen: The Civilian Deportations Chapter Fourteen: Holocaust Historiography Chapter Fifteen: Summation Chapter Sixteen: A Belated But Reluctant Awareness Select Bibliography 2
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On the sixtieth anniversary of the mass deportation of hundreds of thousands of Polish citizens to the Gulag To the memory of countless victims of Communist oppression perpetrated by the organs of the Soviet Union and their local collaborators M. T. poświęcam 3
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Foreword On August 23, 1939, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union entered into a Non-Aggression Pact (the so- called Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact) which paved the way for the imminent invasion of Poland. A Secret Protocol to that Pact provided for the partition of Poland, as well as for Soviet domination of the Baltic States and Bessarabia. 1 Germany attacked Poland on September 1 st , while the Soviet strike was delayed until September 17 th . 2 Polish forces continued to fight pitched battles with the Germans until early October 1939 (the last large battle was fought at Kock on October 5 th ), after which the struggle went underground. After overrunning Poland, the Nazis and Soviets agreed, under the terms of a Secret Supplementary Protocol to the German-Soviet Boundary and Friendship Treaty of September 28, 1939, to a redrawn common border. Each side seized roughly half of Poland, thus ensuring that the country would be once again wiped off the face of Europe. They also undertook a common struggle against Polish resistance—to suppress “all beginnings” of “Polish agitation” and to keep each other informed of their progress. In fact, this ushered in a period of close cooperation between the NKVD and the Gestapo, the secret police of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany. Lists of Poles slated for execution were carefully compiled, traded and expanded. 3 Contacts between those two organizations intensified and meetings were called to discuss how best to combat Polish resistance and eradicate Polish national existence. A joint instructional centre for officers of the NKVD and the Gestapo was opened at Zakopane in December 1939. The decision to massacre Polish
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