History of Photo Feb 26 Notes

History of Photo Feb 26 Notes - February 26, 2008 Technical...

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February 26, 2008 Technical Advances in Photography (Background) -1871-dry plate process-originally released. 1878:available for mass population. Dry plate: piece of glass with silver plat emulsion attached to it. Emulsion is completely dry. Did not need to coat glass before exposure, did not need to do it themselves. Gave way to the mass production of dry plate negatives. Increased availability of film. Did not need immediate availability of dark room. Started on road to much more standardization of industry. Plates were made in specific sizes, and camera parts were made. Mobility of photographers greatly increased without need for darkroom right away. 1888-Kodak (Eastman Company) produced the Kodak camera. Came pre-loaded with (initially) paper film, but by the end of the year had a celluloid roll of film. Pre- loaded with 100 exposures in the camera. Had a fixed aperture and a fixed shutter speed. One size and one time. For daylight usage. Images were initially produced as circles. When you were finished with the exposures, you sent your camera back to Kodak, they made the prints, sent them back with another loaded roll of film in your camera. Allowed non-professionals to capture pictures with photographic equipment. -Small, portable, dry plate camera’s also became available. Ease and access of photographic equipment increased dramatically. -1880’s (popular in 1890’s, more widely visible in 1900’s): Half-tone process. (Still
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History of Photo Feb 26 Notes - February 26, 2008 Technical...

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