Chapter_5.pdf - CHAPTERS AIRSPACE DIVISION AND AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES(ICAO FLIGHT LEVEL 660 UP PER AIRSPACE FIR BOUNDARY SET BY NATIO NAL AVIATI ON

Chapter_5.pdf - CHAPTERS AIRSPACE DIVISION AND AIR TRAFFIC...

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CHAPTERS AIRSPACE DIVISION AND AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES (ICAO) FLIGHT LEVEL 660 UP PER AIRSPACE FIR BOUNDARY SET BY NATIONAL AVIATI ON AUTHORITY OR BY INTERNATIONAL TREATV LOWER AIRSPACE (FIR) AIRWAY TERMINAL CONTROL AREA CONTROLAREA CONTROLLED AIRSPACE UNCONTROLLED AIRSPACE .. 77 AIF?.WAY
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CHAPTER 5: AIRSPACE D/VIS/ON AND AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES (lCA O) 78
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CHAPTER 5: AIRSPACE D/VIS/ON AND AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES (ICAO) CLASSIFICATION OF AIRSPACE. INTRODUCTION. This Chapter deals with the Division of Airspace and Air Traffic Services as agreed internationally in the 'Convention on International Civil Aviation', and, most notably, in Annex 11 to that document. Each ICAO contracting state, while undertaking to endeavour to apply the ICAO-agreed rules, may interpret the ICAO agreements in the context of its own particular requirements. When a contracting state's rules differ from the ICAO agreements, that state "files a difference" with ICAO. In the United Kingdom, these "differences" can be found in the UK Aeronautical Information Publication. The Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) and the European Aviation Safety Ageney (EASA) are organisations which have undertaken to seek to normalise the aviation regulations of their member states by bringing them into line with ICAO standards. As this book is a text book for pilots studying for a JAR-FCL pilot's licence, the information on Airspace Division and Air Traffic Services contained in this Chapter deals exclusively with internationally agreed ICAO standards. For the most part, the information in this chapter will apply in all ICAO member states and in all JAA/EASA member states, but it is important that student pilots refer to their own country's aviation legislation to confirm which information is relevant to their country, and to identify where differences may exist. Relevance of JCAO Standard Regulations to Pilots in the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom (UK) has filed several differences with ICAO in respect of the Division of Airspace and Air Traffic Services. Those differences are covered in Chapter 14. The information contained in this Chapter will be relevant to UK-based pilots and student pilots, except in those cases where differences arenotedin Chapter 14. Among the UK differences are important differences for Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) minima in respect of low-speed aircraft operating at lower levels in some classes of airspace, and in some aspects of aerodrome air traffic services. THE NEED FOR AIRSPACE DIVISION. Following the Second World War, civil aviation expanded rapidly throughout the world. With the advent of the jet engine, first used on military aircraft during the war years, the performance of airliners quickly surpassed that of wartime bombers and fighters, and so airliners began to fly ever faster and higher. At the same time, improvements in navigation and blind-flying instruments permitted commercial transport aircraft to operate in all weathers. As aircraft no longer depended solely on external references to
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  • Spring '18
  • Benan Böke

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