Anexes_Answers.pdf - ANNEXA GENERAL LIGHTS ANDSIGNALS Signal Steady red lig ht to aircraft or vehicle as indicated Red flare from tower or aircraft 345

Anexes_Answers.pdf - ANNEXA GENERAL LIGHTS ANDSIGNALS...

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ANNEXA GENERAL LIGHTS ANDSIGNALS Signal Steady red lig ht to aircraft or vehicle as indicated. Red flare from tower or aircraft. 345
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ANNEX A: GENERAL LIGHTS AND SIGNALS Figure A-1 A Parachute Flare. 346
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ANNEX A: GENERAL L/GHTS AND S/GNALS INTRODUCTION. Even when flown for recreation and/or sport, most aircraft taday, however basic their instrument fit, carry radios. Radiotelephony is, of course, by far the most efficient method for aircraft and Air Traffic Service Units to communicate. lndeed, for several decades past, most large aerodromes and airfields have insisted that aircraft operating into or out of them be equipped with standard VHF radios. Nowadays, then, it is routine for a pilot to obtain information and instructions for the safe conduct of his flight over the radio. Consequently, if a pilot suffers radio failure, he is likely immediately to find himself hindered in the progress of his flight. If either he or his aircraft is in trouble, the absence of radio may make the situation extremely ......__________ _. critica!. lt is, therefore, vitally important for the pilot to be able to understand the various forms and meanings of the signals that may be m ade by Air Traffic Control Services, or for that matter by anyone else, for the attention of aircraft. The pilotmayalsa need to signal to people on the ground concerning his own situation and/or intentions. lt is the aim of this Annex to deseribe the different type of signals that are used for air-ground and ground-air communications. For the most part, the signals are visual signals in the form of lights or pictograms. Distress messages passed by Radiotelephony are dea lt w ith fully in Volume 7 of this series: 'Radiotelephony'. Signals will be presented in this Annex which cover the fallawing situations: Distress & Urgency Signals. Signals For Use in the Event of lnterception. Signals Pertinent to Restricted, Prohibited and Danger Areas. Light Signals Between Aircraft and Air Traffic Service Units. Acknowledgement Signals by Aircraft in the Air. The Signals Square. Marshalling Signals -Marshaller to Pilot. Marshalling Signals -Pilot to Marshaller. DISTRESS & URGENCY. When an aircraft which is airborne is in distress or urgency, the situation istense and a pilot often needs to think primarily about flying the aircraft. If he is alsa experiencing radio failure, the situation is made even more critica!. The fallawing methods of signalling distress and urgency may seem to be desperate measures and, in the case of pyrotechnics and flares, to offer a highly impractical solution to the lig ht aircraft pilot. However, a pilot who can signal an emergency to the ground by any means whatsoever may just manage to create the conditions which prevent disaster. Therefore, the fallawing signals are included in this Annex.
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  • Spring '18
  • Benan Böke

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