Research Paper.docx - Rose 1 Anna Rose English 102...

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Rose 1 Anna Rose English 102 Professor Mitchell 14 April 2017 Plastic Valentine “Plastic” and “Candy Heart Valentine,” written by the experienced and well-known poet Kim Addonizio, both discuss the hardships of the loss of love. These two poems come from her book, Mortal Trash, that “offers [readers] a torrent of images and experiences from someone well aware that time is limited and life is fucked up” (Stake). Her poems have been known to “strike a chord for young women” (Sweeney). By delving into this state of loss, Addonizio gives readers the ability to relate their own experiences to these poems. Her well-chosen words and subtle tones do more for the reading experience than other blatant topics do. Even the titles of these poems show contrast, yet they relate to the same idea, experience, and feeling. Therefore, “Plastic” and “Candy Heart Valentine” show several similarities and differences by way of their subject matter, tone, word choice, and their titles. Addonizio “is a master of compressed intensity who always nails the emotional image” (Whitney). In “Plastic” and “Candy Heart Valentine,” she puts the idea that love is not simple into perspective by using her mastery of poetry to put the ideas within them into perspective by making those feelings and experiences something the readers can visualize. In “Plastic”, the speaker says, “your love is a swirl/ of swill, toothbrushes and swizzle sticks/ carried by the inevitable current” (Addonizio, lines 4-6). This is a more abstract example, but it still shows the readers that whatever love was had did not flow with clear water in one direction. The
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Rose 2 relationship was filled with many different things, some of which are more common, like a toothbrush, and some not-so-common, like a swizzle stick. These objects, like the things of a relationship, get tossed and turned together until it is hard to distinguish which is what. What are the things that matter, and what are the things that do not? Another idea that is shown in “Plastic” is that it can be inferred that the speaker is speaking of their relationship in a past tense, so the reader knows the relationship has ended. This is shown in the lines “Imagine an Evian bottle having a breakdown, getting eaten by a jellyfish which is eaten by a bigger fish which becomes a breaded, deep-fried rectangle on a cafeteria tray” (Addonizio, lines 10-14). There are
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