Free_Speech_Handbook.doc

Free_Speech_Handbook.doc - HANDBOOK OF FREE SPEECH ISSUES...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HANDBOOK OF FREE HANDBOOK OF FREE SPEECH ISSUES SPEECH ISSUES O FFICE OF G ENERAL C OUNSEL T HE C ALIFORNIA S TATE U NIVERSITY M AY 2009
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 II. Freedom of Speech .................................................................................................................. 1 III. What is Protected “Speech?” ................................................................................................. 1 IV. Free Speech on CSU Campuses ............................................................................................. 3 A. “Forum Analysis” ....................................................................................................... 3 B. The California Compatibility Test .............................................................................. 5 C. Time, Place and Manner Restrictions .......................................................................... 5 1. Advance Notice, Registration and Permitting Requirements .......................... 6 a. Members of the Campus Community vs. “Outsiders” ......................... 7 b. Discretion to Grant/Deny Permits ........................................................ 7 c. Length of Advance Notice Requirements ............................................ 7 d. “Spontaneous” Expression ................................................................... 7 2. Free Speech Zones ........................................................................................... 8 3. Equal Access to Facilities ................................................................................ 9 4. Sales and Distribution of Non-Commercial Materials .................................. 10 D. Commercial Speech .................................................................................................. 10 V. Public Employee Speech ..................................................................................................... 11 A. Political Speech ........................................................................................................ 11 B. Religious Speech ........................................................................................................ 12 C. Labor-Related Speech ................................................................................................ 13 D. Matters of Public vs. Private Concern ...................................................................... 15 i
Image of page 2
VI. STUDENT SPEECH ........................................................................................................... 17 A. Student “Academic Freedom” ................................................................................ 17 B. Rules and Policies that Regulate Speech and Conduct ............................................ 17 C. Student Classroom Speech ....................................................................................... 18 D. Student Newspapers ................................................................................................. 19 E. Student Government ………………………………………………………………. 19 ii
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I. INTRODUCTION The right to free speech, when applied in a university context, can be complicated and confusing. This manual provides basic information and is intended to be a campus resource when particular questions arise. University Counsel are always available to help respond to questions about specific situations. II. FREEDOM OF SPEECH The First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides that Congress shall “make no law…abridging the freedom of speech….” The First Amendment is made applicable to the States through the Fourteenth Amendment. The California Constitution provides that “[e]very person may freely speak, write and publish his or her sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of this right. A law may not restrain or abridge liberty of speech or press.” 1 Courts have held that the California free speech clause is “more definitive and inclusive than the First Amendment .... 2 It is widely understood that freedom of speech prohibits the government from interfering with one’s own speech. It is less well known that this same prohibition extends to interfering with the right to hear what someone else has to say, or compelling someone to express certain views, adhere to a particular ideological viewpoint or subsidize speech to which s/he objects. 3 III. WHAT IS PROTECTED “SPEECH?” “Speech” that is protected by law includes a broad array of expressive conduct -- oral, written, pictoral and other expressive means that convey an idea. “Symbolic speech,” such as burning the flag at a protest rally, is also protected, so long as it is not intertwined with additional factors such as disruptive conduct, which is not protected.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern