seeingthescreen.doc - SEEING THE SCREEN research into...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SEEING THE SCREEN: research into visual and digital writing practices Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University ABSTRACT Within the range of approaches one could take toward visuals, this chapter circles over  approaches attentive to the analysis and production of texts that mix alphabetic with other visual  elements. The chapter begins with terms for naming objects on pages and screens and considers  arguments that these terms reveal problematic dichotomies embodying cultural values. Because  semiotics provided some of the first applications of text-based theories to visuals, the chapter then delineates what and how semiotics—and its developments into visual culture and social semiotics —encourages us to see in, first, advertising and then other visible texts. The focus shifts from  analysis to production in visual literacy, technical communication, and rhetoric; how these  approaches contextualize production shows how deeply embedded our research practices are in  shaping what is or is not visible to us. Threaded throughout these visual approaches is  technology’s place within textual production; this chapter reviews shifts that digital technologies  have brought to considerations of what writing is, how it is read, who produces it, and who owns  it in order to signal current research directions.  INTRODUCTION Responsibility for the visual aspects of printed pages belonged once to graphic designers: because our history of printing technologies and books (described in earlier chapters) has separated  responsibilities in the production of pages, writers have used rhetorical and subject knowledge to  produce and arrange words while designers have used knowledge about readability, aesthetics,  and the technologies of the printing press to give those words visual shape. While it has been  possible for writers to have say in the look of their words (Mallarm é ’s  Un Coup de D é s , 1998,  Derrida’s  Gla s, 1990, or Ronell’s  The Telephone Book , 1991), with digitization, “graphics,  moving images, sounds, shapes, spaces, and texts …. become computable; that is, they comprise  simply another set of computer data,” (Manovich, 2001, p. 20); when photographs, video,  animation, and sound become—in digital memory—equivalent to words, practices once limited  to the arrangement and production of one mode can be tested with others, as when composition  teachers include visual and aural along with verbal texts in their classes or when rhetorical  analyses similarly include the visual.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern