Formal Lab Report Daniela Campisi.docx - Name Daniela...

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Name Daniela Campisi Student number 500636146 Instructor Karen Puddephatt Title: Evolution of dendrobates tinctorius ‘azureus’ via non-ranom mating Submitted: Monday February 27 2017 For course: CBLG 144 I understand that it is a violation of the Academic Code of Conduct to copy answers or text from another student, either verbatim or in substance (i.e. to use another student’s answers but rephrase in my own words). I also understand that it is a violation of the Academic Code of Conduct to share my answers or text with another student in a way that facilitates copying of my answers. Such violations could result in a charge of Academic Misconduct. In submitting this assignment for a grade, I am declaring that the work presented is my own original work, other than the data in Table 1 that was provided by my instructor.
Introduction The blue poison dart frog, dendrobates tinctorius ‘azureus', can be found in the Guiana shield as either spotted or un spotted (Comeault and Noonan 2011). Defined as an aposematic species (Wang and Shaffer 2008), its spots serve as repellent towards predators. Another defining characteristic that these frogs possess is a lack of toe webbing, so unlike many of their common relatives blue poison dart frogs are poor swimmers and are therefore found on land (National Aquarium … 2017). The evolution of this species was looked at based on calculations according to the Hardy Weinberg Principle. Based on the following equations: (1) p^2 + q^2 =1 and (2) p^2 + 2pq +q^2 =1 (where p=frequency of the dominant allele, q= frequency of the recessive allele, p^2= the number of homozygous dominant individuals, 2pq= the number of heterozygous individuals, and q^2= the number of

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