Vital signs CH 29 Test 2

Vital signs CH 29 Test 2 - Term Definition Vital signs Body...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Term: Vital signs Definition: Body temp, pulse, respirations, blood pressure, and pain. Oxygen saturation is also usually taken with these. Term: Body Tempurature Definition: Reflects the balance between heat produced and heat lost from the body, and is measured in heat units called degrees. Term: Core Teperature Definition: The temperature of the deep tissues of the body, such as abdominal cavity and pelvic cavity. It remains relatively constant. Term: Surface Temperature Definition: The temperature of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and fat. It, by contrast, rises and falls in response to the environment. Term: Heat balance Definition: When the amount of heat produced by the body equals the amount of heat lost.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Term: Basal metabolic rate (BMR) heat production Definition: The rate of energy utilization in the body required to maintain essential activities such as breathing. This decreases with age. Term: Heat production Definition: Basal metabolism, muscular activity (shivering)' thyroxine and epinephrine (stimulating effects on metabolic rate), temperature effect on cells. Term: Heat loss Definition: Radiation, conduction/convection, evaporation. Term: Muscle activity heat production Definition: Shivering, increases metabolic rate. Term: Thyroxine Output heat production Definition: Increases rate of cellular metabolism throughout body.
Image of page 2
Term: Epinephrine, norepinephrine, and sympathetic stimulation/ stress response heat production Definition: These hormones immediately increase the rate of cellular metabolism in many body tissues. Term: Fever Definition: Increases the cellular metabolic rate and thus increases body temperature. Term: Radiation Definition: The transfer of heat from the surface of one object to the surface of another without contact between two objects. Term: Regulation of body temperature Definition: Sensors in the periphery and in the core, an integrator in the hypothalamus, and an effector system that adjust the production and loss of heat. Term: Factors affecting body temperature Definition: Age, diurnal variations (circadian rhythms) , exercise, hormones, stress, environment.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Term: Normal range of body temp Definition: 36-37.5C, 96.8-99.5F Term: Pyrexia Definition: Temperature above normal range. Term: Hyperthermia Definition: Fever Term: Hyperprexia Definition: A very high fever 41C (105.8F) Term: Febrile Definition: A client who has a fever.
Image of page 4
Term: Afebrile Definition: A client who does not have a fever. Term: Times to asses vital signs Definition: To obtain baseline data, client has a change in health status, or chest pain or feeling hot or faint, before and after surgery, before and after the administer of meds that could effect respiratory or cardiovascular systems, before and any nursing interventions that could affect vitals signs. Term: Onset fever Definition: Increased heart rate, increased respiratory rate and depth, shivering, pallid or cold skin, complains of feeling cold, cyanotic nail beds, "goose flesh", cessation of sweating.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern