Notes 1.31.08 - 1/31/2008 Family Theories Finish Symbolic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1/31/2008 Family Theories Finish Symbolic Interactionist Social Exchange Family Life Course Development New! Biosocial Perspective Discuss news critique papers Methods (2) Application of research Tuesdays Qs Family Theories What are the theories & perspectives used to organize & explain families? Focus Example Strengths & Weaknesses Symbolic Interactionist Theory Strengths Understanding of family based on members viewpoints. More than one normal family form. Limitations Focuses on individual & ignores role of larger social context. Difficult to test empirically. Social Exchange Theory People use their resources to bargain and secure advantage in relationships. This is a theory that adopts an economic model of human behavior based on costs, benefits/rewards, and the expectation of reciprocity. Grew out of an economic perspective on social relationships. Focus Rational decision-makers Key Concepts: All actions and relationships are measured on a cost-benefit analysis, and individuals are assumed to be rational in the sense that they weigh costs vs. benefits and engage in actions/relationships that maximize their rewards and minimize their costs . Behavior (what individuals do) = Rewards of interaction costs of interaction. Do benefits Equity The principle of equity applies here. Equity = Fairness based on the idea that partners stay in relationships as long as they perceive that they are getting what they deserve; they get something from the relationships equivalent to what they put into it. Focuses on the exchange of resources (benefits) between family members tangible resources money, social intangible resources intelligence, sense of humor, attractiveness. Family rewarding The family group is considered to be a source of rewards for individual family members Well, social exchange theories explain this with the following two principles. Comparison Level of Alternatives = We consider the other options to our current situation. Exit costs or barriers to leaving days, no means of financially supporting oneself). Tend to stay in unrewarding relationship when exit costs are high. Example: Relationship satisfaction. Example: So let's say that you are in a relationship. Social exchange theorists predict that your satisfaction and whether you stay in the relationship depends on the extent to which the rewards you receive outweigh the costs and that the relationship is equitable (i.e., you perceive that you are getting out of the relationship what you are putting into it)....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course HDF 304 taught by Professor Gray during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 51

Notes 1.31.08 - 1/31/2008 Family Theories Finish Symbolic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online