POLA02 Syllabus Revolutions Way-2018 - POLA02 Critical Issues in Politics I Revolutions Winter 2018 Tuesday 11-1 SW 319 Professor Lucan Ahmad Way

POLA02 Syllabus Revolutions Way-2018 - POLA02 Critical...

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POLA02 – Critical Issues in Politics I: RevolutionsWinter 2018Tuesday 11-1SW 319Professor Lucan Ahmad WayAdministrative Details:Office: MW232Office Hours: Tuesday 1-2Email: [email protected]Teaching Assistants:Kavita Reddy: [email protected]Shaukat Ansari: [email protected]Course Overview :This course will explore the origins and impact of social and political revolutions in the 20thand 21stcenturies. Why, in rare instances, have countries witnessed the sudden and fundamental transformation state, regime, and society? What has been the impact of such revolutions on thesecountries and on the global order? To understand revolutions, this course focuses first on the “classic” social revolutions in Russia in 1917; China in 1949; and Iran in 1979. We also explore the bloody Cambodian revolution and genocide from 1975 until 1979. Finally, we examine political revolutions in the Middle East in 2011.To understand revolutions, this course will draw particular attention to the distinction between voluntaristapproaches that focus on the role of individuals and contingency in shaping major outcomes and structuralapproaches that center instead on big processes outside of the control of any individual. Students will be expected to apply this and other major theoretical distinctions toreal-world historical cases.In addition, students will:oLearn how to read and assess academic articles in political science.oLearn how to construct an argument and support it with reasons and evidence.oLearn how to construct and write a political science essay.oBe made aware of the academic resources available to you at the University.Requirements:Your final grade will be determined by your performance in these areas:1.Reading Journal (10%) 2.Tutorial Participation (5%)3.Lecture attendance (5%)1
4.Midterm Exam (20%)5.Critical Essay (30%)6.Final Examination (30%)1. Reading Journals (10%) The assigned readings for this course are mandatory. The reading is crucial to understand what is going on in lecture and one of the objectives of this class is for you learn to and practice reading like a political scientist. In addition, the readings and lectures complement one another—you will not succeed by doing either alone. In order to help you keep up with the readings andpractice reading critically, you will keep a reading journal over the course of the term. The reading journal entries (maximum of 250 words) are designed to help you understand the concepts and theories covered in the course and to map the arguments in political science articles, which will also help you develop your own arguments in your essays. They are not expected to be highly polished essays – but to reflect your initial ideas about the reading.There will be two types of journal entries: article mappingand study questions. Inarticle mapping, you will describe the central thesis and arguments in the assigned reading. Such entries should include the following1. Central question in the reading (1 sentence) 2. Thesis of the reading (1-2 sentences)

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