3.docx - TABLE OF CONTENT COMPONENTS 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 1.0 GUIDELINES MARKING CRITERIA TASK 1 TASK 2 References Coursework PAGES 3-18 19-27 27 28-39 TASK

3.docx - TABLE OF CONTENT COMPONENTS 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 1.0...

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TABLE OF CONTENT COMPONENTS GUIDELINES/ MARKING CRITERIA PAGES 1.0 TASK 1 3-18 2.0 TASK 2 19-27 3.0 References 27 4.0 Coursework 28-39 1.0 TASK 1 Negotiation is an integral part of daily life and the opportunities to negotiate surround us. While some people may look like born negotiators, negotiation is
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fundamentally a skill involving analysis and communication that everyone can learn. You are required to provide 10 “best practices” for negotiators who which to continue to improve their negotiation. 1. Recognize that the real purpose of the negotiation is not to sign a deal, but to accomplish something Often this means working backwards from what it is you are hoping to accomplish, to determine what it is you really need your counterpart to help you do. Understanding what you and they need to do differently after the deal is signed will help inform how you should negotiate. 2. Make sure that stakeholders (yours and theirs) are aligned so that implementation can proceed smoothly Typically, this requires consulting more, rather than less, broadly speaking. When implementation matters, you need to involve more stakeholders, on your side and theirs, than might be strictly necessary to reach agreement. Leaving the implementers out of the negotiation makes it more likely that they will be unwilling or unable to live up to commitments made on their behalf. Page 2 of 38
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3. Recognize that the way you deal with each other during the negotiation will impact how you work together during implementation Whether we like it or not, the negotiation is the first, best example we have of what it is like to work together. We can use that opportunity to create a useful history of collaboration and problem solving, or we can waste it by posturing, withholding information, springing surprises, coercing, and damaging trust. 4. Confront the hard issues instead of repressing or minimizing them to get the deal signed It is easy to bury your head in the sand and avoid raising difficult topics during the negotiation. After all, you don’t want to give offense, and besides, those problems “might not happen.” But ignoring risk doesn’t make it less risky. Addressing it jointly, however, gives us more opportunities to prevent potential problems or to mitigate their impact. 5. Make sure your counterparts understand what they are agreeing to, and can actually deliver, rather than treating any ambiguity or potential difficulty in performing as “their problem” Some negotiators measure success by the number of commitments they can extract from their counterparts. But commitments they can’t deliver on are hardly worth the paper Page 3 of 38
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they are written on. Relying on enforcing penalties in the contract later doesn’t get you a successful event when you need it.
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