CMRJ203 Midterm.docx - The Broken Windows theory is an approach to policing intended to be proactive instead of reactive by focusing on neighborhoods

CMRJ203 Midterm.docx - The Broken Windows theory is an...

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The Broken Windows theory is an approach to policing intended to be proactive instead of reactive by focusing on neighborhoods and communities that are untended and unkempt. This theory proposes that broken-down neighborhoods do not necessarily cause crime, but that they become magnets for crime and delinquent behavior because of their disorganization. Residents may become laxer in their civility and criminals, and other delinquents may then be drawn to these areas of lawlessness. Some strengths of this strategy are Juvenile intervention; "police could catch young troublemakers early, allowing them to realize the implications of illegal behavior while they are young" (Noble, 2015). In several studies, crime rates dropped by at least fifteen percent. By allowing law enforcement departments to work directly with communities in order to establish standards and work together removing those in the community who are drug addicts, gang members, drunks, indigents, and those who violate neighborhood normality. As a result of Wilson and Kelling's proposal of broken windows, many law enforcement agencies began to take aim at these so-called "broken windows" issues to protect the civility and peacefulness of neighborhoods. Several law enforcement agencies began to place a greater focus on minor or victimless crimes like street prostitution, drugs, vandalism, littering, and loitering (Lombardo & Lough, 2007). While some of these currently defined crimes may be unpleasant, they represent a shift in police resources away from more serious offenses in a hopeful effort to prevent many serious crimes, or at least to protect certain communities from crime. ne main weakness of the Broken Windows theory is that these communities that the broken windo communities are statistically made up of low-income families and residents, below average education, minorities, and immigrants. This alone can hinder the department’s ability to
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work and bond with the community since they are afraid of police officers and will be very reluctant to work hand in hand with patrols. Another weakness of the broken windows theory is that it seems to ignore many of the actual motivations behind crime (Lombardo & Lough, 2007). While it may have an argument to account for why some areas experience more crime and delinquency than others, it fails in explaining the underlying causes of serious crime. References Lombardo, R., & Lough, T. (2007). Community policing: Broken windows, community building, and satisfaction with the police. The Police Journal: Theory, Practice and Principles, 80(2), 117-140. doi:10.1350/pojo.2007.80.2.117 Noble, B. (2015, June 16). Pros and Cons of 'Broken Window' Crime Prevention Strategy. Retrieved April 02, 2017, from - pros-cons-crime/2015/06/16/id/650794/
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There are several reasons why police methods have been mostly reactive through the decades are because it offers law enforcement an impartiality since they are not attached to the residents. Studies have shown that hiring more police officers, unfocused, random patrolling, and reactive arrests does not prevent serious crime. Community policing without a clear focus on
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