Literary Terms & Rhetorical Devices

Literary Terms & Rhetorical Devices - Term Definition...

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Term: Paradox Definition: a figure of speech in which a statement appears to contradict itself + a statement that seems unlikely is actually true * "War is peace" Term: Euphemism Definition: replacing an offensive term w/ a term that is less offensive * harsh --> polite Term: Anaphora Definition: the repetition of a word/phrase at the beginning of successive phrases/clauses + used for emphasis/effect * "We shall... we shall... we shall..." Term: Antithesis Definition: a statement in which two strongly contrasting ideas are balanced by means of parallel grammatical structure * "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times."
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Term: Personification Definition: giving human-like qualities to non-human objects/animals Term: Litotes Definition: a form of understatement + using the negative of its opposite * "the food wasn't bad" Term: Chiasmus Definition: a verbal pattern in which the second half is reversed from the first half + a type of antithesis. *fair is foul - foul is fair Term: Hyperbole Definition: extreme exaggeration Term: Metaphor Definition: direct comparison without using like/as
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Term: Anecdote Definition: a short account of an interesting/humorous incident, intended to illustrate/support a point Term: Tone Definition: the writer's attitude toward the subject, characters, or audience. Usually implied - not directly stated. * "The dear old year 1775." Term: Pathos Definition: the quality in a work that prompts the reader to feel PITY + pathetic * Sarah McLachlan - animal abuse commercial Term: Foreshadow Definition: a hint, suggestion, or clue in a story to suggest future events
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Term: Analogy Definition:
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