motivating african american males to suceed.pdf

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Journal of Negro Education Educating and Motivating African American Males to Succeed Author(s): Antoine M. Garibaldi Source: The Journal of Negro Education, Vol. 61, No. 1 (Winter, 1992), pp. 4-11 Published by: Journal of Negro Education Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2295624 Accessed: 03-03-2018 03:03 UTC JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at http://about.jstor.org/terms Journal of Negro Education is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Journal of Negro Education This content downloaded from 45.18.79.5 on Sat, 03 Mar 2018 03:03:59 UTC All use subject to http://about.jstor.org/terms
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Educating and Motivating African American Males to Succeed Antoine M. Garibaldi, Xavier University of Louisiana One of the most actively discussed, and sometimes vigorously debated, issues since the late 1980s has been the declining social, economic, and educational status of young African American males in our society. The negative indicators that describe a substantial share of this group's depressing condition in unemployment statistics, homicide rates (as both victims and perpetrators), their overwhelmingly disproportionate repre- sentation in the criminal justice system, as well as their last-place ranking on many measures of educational performance and attainment have become so commonplace that it has caused many to view the majority of these young men's futures as hopeless and impossible to salvage. Even if one doubts that a "crisis" truly exists or questions whether African American males may one day become an "endangered species," few systematic solutions have been offered to address realistically the problems that at least one-third of young Black men experience. Many conferences, symposia, and workshops have been held over the last few years (and I confess that I have been a participant in some of those meetings), but too much of our time has been devoted to discussing the plight of African American males rather than developing potential solutions to mitigate this crisis. Remedies do exist, and this article high- lights some educational solutions developed more than four years ago which might reverse the negative trends that have become widely associ- ated with African American males. THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDY ON BLACK MALES My own involvement with this topic began in 1987 when I was asked by the New Orleans Public School System to chair a task force of commu- nity leaders and educators to review the status of African American males in that city's schools. The specific charge of the committee was to examine the rates of school retention, suspension, expulsion, academic achieve-
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