Culturally Responsive.pdf - What Research Says Improving...

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What Research Says: Improving Minority Student Achievement by Making Cultural Connections Author(s): Judith L. Irvin and Delmae Darling Source: Middle School Journal, Vol. 36, No. 5 (May 2005), pp. 46-50 Published by: Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE) Stable URL: Accessed: 03-03-2018 03:11 UTC REFERENCES Linked references are available on JSTOR for this article: You may need to log in to JSTOR to access the linked references. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE) is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Middle School Journal This content downloaded from 45.18.79.5 on Sat, 03 Mar 2018 03:11:31 UTC All use subject to
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# What Research Says Judith L. Irvin, Editor Improving Minority Student Achievement by Making Cultural Connections By Delmae Darling Experts predict that by 2020 almost half of the nation's school population will consist of members of non-Caucasian cultural groups (U.S. Bureau of Census, 2000). These students come from a variety of cultures, speak many different languages, and possess a range of abilities and talents. The large influx of minorities entering the nation's school system naturally causes concern (Kauchak & Eggen, 2002). Are educators prepared to address the multi tude of cultural, linguistic, and academic issues that face them in their classrooms? A national survey conducted by the National Education Association (2002) documented that approximately 90% of teachers are white, five percent black, and the remainder are other races. Some critics claim that this cultural mismatch between student and teacher is one of the reasons that many minority students are failing in public schools. Teachers who are not of color may experience difficulty motivating, engaging, or even connecting with these students to increase academic performance (Carter & Goodwin, 1994; Delpit, 1988; Kunjufu, 2002; Shujaa, 1994). Therefore, cultural awareness among teachers and students cannot be ignored (Delpit, 1995; Gay, 2000; Ladson-Billings, 1999). In this article, what the literature says about culture, the importance of acknowledging culture, and alternatives to closing the achievement gap among minority students are discussed to provide a perspective for those committed to improving the educational opportunities of minority youth.
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