ps02_extras_solns

ps02_extras_solns - Chapter 26: Geometrical Optics Answers...

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Chapter 26: Geometrical Optics Answers to Even-Numbered Conceptual Questions 6. No. Light bends toward the normal when it enters a medium in which its speed of propagation is less than it was in the first medium – as when light passes from air to water. On the other hand, light bends away from the normal if it enters a medium in which its speed is increased – as when light passes from water to air. 10. The Sun is already well below the horizon when you see it setting. The reason is that as the Sun’s light enters the atmosphere from the vacuum of space, it is bent toward the normal; that is, toward the surface of Earth. Therefore, the light from the Sun can still reach us even when a straight line from our eyes to the Sun would go below the horizon. 12. The oil used in the bottle to the left has an index of refraction that is equal to the index of refraction of the glass in the eye dropper. Therefore, light is undeflected when it passes from the oil to the glass or from the glass to the oil. Since light propagates the same as if the eye dropper were not present, the dropper is invisible. Answers to Even-Numbered Conceptual Exercises 12. When light goes from air to glass it slows down; when it goes from glass to air it speeds up. In general, the speed of light is determined solely by the medium in which it propagates, irrespective of its past history.
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Solutions to Problems 43. Picture the Problem : The figure shows a scuba diver who sees the sun at an angle of 35 from the vertical. The incident sunlight makes an angle of i with the vertical. Strategy: Use Snell’s Law (equation 26-11) to calculate the incident angle of the sunlight. The angle of the sun from the horizontal is i 90 . θ ° - Solution: 1. Calculate the incident angle: air i w 2 11 w i2 air sin sin 1.33 sin sin sin sin35 50 1.000 nn n n θθ -- =  = = ° = °   2. Find the Sun’s angle above the horizon: i 90 90 50 40 = ° - = ° - ° = ° Insight: The scuba diver perceives the Sun to be much higher in the sky than does his friend on the shore. 45. Picture the Problem : The figure shows light traveling from point A to point B through the two regions with different indices of refraction.
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course PHYS 1104 taught by Professor Wiegert during the Spring '08 term at UGA.

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ps02_extras_solns - Chapter 26: Geometrical Optics Answers...

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