Week 4 Leadership.docx - Week 4 Leadership Part One You are a Family Nurse Practitioner employed in a busy primary care office The providers in the

Week 4 Leadership.docx - Week 4 Leadership Part One You are...

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Week 4 Leadership Part One You are a Family Nurse Practitioner employed in a busy primary care office. The providers in the group include one physician and three nurse practitioners. The back office staff includes eight medical assistants who assist with patient care as well as filing, answering calls from patients, processing laboratory results and taking prescription renewal requests from patients and pharmacies. Stephanie, a medical assistant, has worked in the practice for 10 years and is very proficient at her job. She knows almost every patient in the practice, and has an excellent rapport with all of the providers. Mrs. Smith was seen today in the office for an annual physical. Her last appointment was a year ago for the same reason. During this visit, Mrs. Smith brought an empty bottle of Amoxicillin with her and asked if she could have a refill. You noted the patient’s name on the label and the date on the bottle was one week ago. You also noted your name printed on the label as the prescriber. The patient admitted that she called last week concerned about her cough and spoke to Stephanie. You do not recall having discussed this patient with Stephanie, nor do the other providers in the practice. Discussion Question: What is your next logically sound course of action? Provide evidence to support your response. Hi Dr. G., The case study above presents safety, ethical, and legal trepidations for every involved, such as the patient, the practice, the medical assistant, and the nurse practitioner. Even though Stephanie has worked in the practice for 10 years and is competent in her role as a medical assistant, she does not have authority nor the capability to authorize a refill for any patient. Stephanie is clearly practicing out her scope of practice by filling Mrs. Smith’s prescription without the authorization of the NP or physicians. Medical assistants (MA) work under the direct supervision of a licensed physician and/or certified nurse practitioner. The physician or NP have the ability within their state to delegate certain medical tasks and procedures to the medical assistants that is within their scope of practice (Gregory, 2014). However, the prescribing medications is not within an MA’s scope of practice and even if the physician of NP would have asked Stephanie to call in the prescription for Mrs. Smith, it was up to Stephanie to notify the physician and NP her inability to do so. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN) defines scope of practice as the processes, engagements, and methods permitted for a licensed person and are restricted to that which the law allows for particular education and experience and specific demonstrated competency (Gregory, 2014). During her office visit, Mrs. Smith notified the NP that she needed a refill for an antibiotic that was ordered for Mrs. Smith, over the phone last week without a physical assessment being done by either a physician or NP. The best way to go about this situation is by performing a chart review to see if anyone saw Mrs. Smith or authorized the prescription for the patient. If a physician or NP approved the
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  • Fall '15
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  • Nursing, Advanced practice nurse, Registered nurse, Healthcare occupations, Nursing specialties, Discussions Week 4

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