speech rate.docx - Running Head PHONOLOGY 1 Reliability of...

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Running Head: PHONOLOGY 1 Reliability of Using Syllables per Second to Measure Speech Rate Name Professor Institution Course Date
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PHONOLOGY 2 Reliability of Using Syllables per Second to Measure Speech Rate Introduction Speakers can generate speech at diverse anticipated rates when provoked to do so. The degree of practical, syntactic and semantic cohesiveness between the words spoken determines whether they fit in a particular linguistic fundamental or not (Kendall, 2013 pg. 37). Even though people make judgments about how fast an individual speaks, it is not simple to work out on the basis of these conclusions. It is worth knowing that some languages appear to be spoken at high speed, while other languages sound rather steady and slow. This leads to variation in speech rate: the measure of the number of speech units produces a given amount of time. The most recognized measure that measures speech rate is syllables per second. In fact, syllable per second measure is considered because it gives a more accurate unit of measure than words per minute, and aids to point out the higher degree of precision available with modern techniques than was available in the past. This makes it a reliable and cross-linguistically consistent measure for speech rate. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reliability of using syllable per second measure. Advantages of syllable per second in diverse Languages A number of scholars and researchers have discussed the reliability as well as the consistency of syllable per second measure. As Toraldo and Lorusso (2012 pg. 125) assert, speech rate differ within the speech of one individual due to the emotional and contextual aspects, between different dialects and also between diverse speakers and languages. It is quite probable that some words make more use of hesitations and pauses than others, and the speech rate could be influenced by this. When study about speed rate is carried out, pauses and
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PHONOLOGY 3 hesitations must be included. In most scenarios, it makes sense, nevertheless, to separate the rate when essentially speaking from pauses. This is known as articulation rate. Brown (2014 pg. 54) points out that the normal articulation rates for typical speech are 4-8 syllables per second. The rate of a syllable is measured from the start of one syllable (syllable inception) to another. For considerable high-quality speech, syllable inceptions may be distinguished automatically, however, when the quality of speech gets worse, the accuracy of syllable inception detection reduces. In this case, speech rate can be said to reflect speaking style.
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