Case brief Rev.docx - Running Head CASE BRIEF 1 Guinnin vs...

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Running Head: CASE BRIEF 1 Guinnin vs Superintendent of Mockingbird High Name Professor Institution Course Date
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CASE BRIEF 2 Guinnin vs Superintendent of Mockingbird High The question before this court is whether freedom of speech under the First Amendment was violated by the superintendent from Mockingbird high school after she suspended Emma Gunnin for 30 days. Public school students have a variety of free-expression rights in accordance to the First Amendment. Students can speak, assemble to create groups, publish articles and even appeal school administrators on different issues (Epstein and Walker, 2015). In essence, the First Amendment guarantees freedom of expression. However, it should be noted that the privilege can be restricted if the speech reasonably and considerably disrupts the school environment or assaults the rights of others. As far as the question before this court is concerned, the actions of suspending Emma for 30 days did not violate her first amendment rights neither did it quelled her educational experience nor harmed her chances to get into a college. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees the freedoms that establish the essence of America. The freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment include speech, assembly, petition, religion and press. That said, there are many forms and areas of expression which are curtailed in public schools in ways which match up with the constitution. Schools can and have established rules and regulations, for instance, which could indeed be interpreted as a restriction to students' free speech; however, they have been continually found to be following the constitution. Public and private schools can have policies which limit student's free speech which unacceptable in broader society. Specific terms, even distinct tones of voice are subject to official authorization within a school context to preserve the uprightness of the educational duty. It should be noted that students have the right to express themselves. The freedom of speech may only be restricted when it is so factually pervasive or severe that it sensibly can be
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CASE BRIEF 3 considered to interfere with another student's capability to learn (Epstein and Walker, 2015). Even though students do possess First Amendment freedom of speech, the school administrators are allowed by the law to regulate specific forms of student expression. For instance, school administrators may restrict speech that considerably and reasonably interferes the school setting, or that assaults the right of others. Many jurisdictions and previous cases have held that school officials can limit student speech that is vulgar. Nevertheless, the language generates two critical
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