46_km-champions.doc - Using"knowledge champions to...

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Using "knowledge champions" to facilitate knowledge management Nory B. Jones, Richard T. Herschel, Douglas D. Moesel The Authors Nory B. Jones, Nory B. Jones is an Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at the University of Maine. She received her Ph.D. in Information Systems from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Her research interests include knowledge management, collaborative technologies, and organizational learning. Richard T. Herschel, Richard T. Herschel is an Associate Professor of Information Systems at St. Joseph's University, Department of Management and Information Systems Erivan K. Haub School of Business. He received his Ph.D. in Information Systems from Indiana University. His focal area of research is knowledge management. Douglas D. Moesel, Douglas D. Moesel is an Assistant Professor of Management at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in management from Texas A&M University. His research interests include venture capital, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Abstract Executives and strategists have long recognized the value of knowledge as a primary driving source for a firm's sustainable competitive advantage - hence the creation by many firms of a position called the chief knowledge officer (CKO). However, many people have proposed differing perspectives and models relating to the concept of knowledge management. In this paper differing knowledge management viewpoints are examined, by examining and integrating theories relating to the diffusion of innovations and change agents. The roles of change agents, innovators, and opinion leaders, such as CKOs, are explored in terms of effective knowledge management strategies and techniques. A model and strategies are proposed that can serve as a framework for CKOs and other knowledge management change agents to effectively facilitate the acquisition and use of knowledge in the firm by effectively using an organizational memory system. Article type: Theoretical with worked example. Keywords: Chief executives, Change, Knowledge management, Open systems, Organizational learning. Content Indicators: Research Implications** Practice Implications*** Originality** Readability** Journal of Knowledge Management Volume 7 Number 1 2003 pp. 49-63 Copyright © MCB University Press ISSN 1367-3270
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Introduction The development of the chief knowledge officer (CKO) function suggests a growing recognition that for many an organization, intellectual capital - the knowledge, experience, and ideas of people at every level of the firm - impacts a firm's products, services, processes, and customers. Moreover, as Stuller (1998) notes, these positions send an important signal to the organization that knowledge is an asset to be managed and shared. The need to manage knowledge more effectively is necessitated by a changing competitive environment. When functioning in a global economy, companies can no longer expect that the products and services that made them successful in the past will keep them viable in the future.
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