194285-Literature Research Paper.doc - Surname 1 Students...

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Surname 1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Name 30 November 2017 Anglo-Norman French Themes in Medieval Age Medieval texts and related themes can be traced to the Middle Ages from around the 5 th century to the 15 th century. During this period, tales were told and written in narrative form. This essay seeks to outline the various themes narrated in the texts of this time. Love Love is an excessively prevalent theme in medieval texts. It exhibits the cohesion of this era and from it bud other themes that constantly refer and revolve around it. In Marie de France’s Lais, love is depicted as a characteristic that softens the ferociousness of life in the King’s courts. This is evidenced by the tale on Lanval who is a Knight among Knights in the court. He dwells in loneliness and life has dealt him an unfair take as a sojourner who cannot even be given land or own much despite his devoted loyalty to the King Arthur. The treatment by society makes his situation worse as nobody really minds about him. However, with the introduction of love in his life through an unknown lady who accords him status that even emperors could hardly ever have “afforded even the right-hand side of” the knight Lanval is seen to blossom and brings happiness to his fellow Knights. Love seems to have been the missing ingredient in his life to drive away the lone and attract the company of many.
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Surname 2 In a different instance, in the texts from The Canterbury Tales , sojourning Knights namely Arcite and Palamon are in love with a lady at court, Emelye. In these texts, the theme of love is slightly twisted to depict its pervasiveness and unpredictability. Despite the two Knights being imprisoned, the mere sight of the courts lady Emelye makes them fall head over heels. While Arcite is freed and courts Emelye, Palamon escapes prison to seek a hand in her love too. This brings out the competitive nature with which love is at times. The consequence of this is that the King is made aware of this and makes the two to fight with a prize for the winner being Emelye (Chaucer, 1989). Arcite wins but in ill fate dies and surprisingly, the loser Palamon marries Emelye. Unlike in Marie de France’s Lais, The Canterbury Tales show the unpredictability of love, its inception and growth that are always varying. Love as a theme is also narrated as brotherly deep and sometimes confusing, bitter and sweet in the lay Eliduc. Eliduc is a Knight of great honor, courageous and a leader in equal measure. He is very loved by the King of Brittany. This accords him great favor and privilege including the ability to farm far and wide and hunt in areas so vast without regulations. The consequence of this love is that other Knights and subjects grow into enemies due to envy to the extent of blackmailing him before the King. The King banishes him and he leaves the court. In
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