Annotated Bibliography89.rtf - PAYING COLLEGE ATHLETES...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PAYING COLLEGE ATHLETES ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Paying College Athletes Annotated Bibliography James J Jones Columbia Southern University 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PAYING COLLEGE ATHLETES ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Paying College Athletes Annotated Bibliography Here’s Why We Shouldn’t Pay College Athletes. (n.d.). Retrieved March 7, 2018, from In this article, the author, Thelin compares two different scenarios; a college athlete getting a salary of 100,000 U.S. dollars and a college athlete getting a 65,000 U.S. dollars’ worth of scholarship. Thelin shows how it is a disadvantage for both the student and the school to have a $100,000 salary rather than a scholarship because so much of the salary would be taken out from taxes and you would still have to pay for education. This article is a good example of why paying college athletes in salary would not work and the numbers Thelin plays with show how it would not benefit either side. This article can be effectively used to present a logical example to the reader that why college athletes should not be paid. This comes from a reliable resource and I will use his research to show the real reason why we do not pay them in the first place. Lemmons, M. (2017, March 29). College Athletes Getting Paid? Here Are Some Pros And Cons. Retrieved March 7, 2018, from - getting-paid-here-are-some-pros-cons_us_58cfcee0e4b07112b6472f9a Lemmons' article first describes how the issue of paying college athletes could be a race issue. He shows the percentages of black and white people supporting college paying college athletes. He also explains the lawsuit in 2014 involving Ed O’Bannon and others who were sued for violating the United States' anti-trust laws. Then the article lists 2
Image of page 2
PAYING COLLEGE ATHLETES ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY the basic pros and cons of paying college athletes. It is easy to see the different viewpoints on the issue because every pro and every con makes a lot of sense. Lemmons makes it clear that he does not stand on a certain side with this issue, but questions whether it is unfair, racial, or unnecessary to pay college athletes. It is a very excellent reading to get both sides of the argument.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern