Research paper 2017.docx - Shayna Frances Gott period 6...

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Shayna Frances Gott period 6 Lack of responsibility for one’s actions can prove fatal in a relationship. Junot Diaz’s The Sun, the Moon, the Stars highlights this idea through the protagonist. Junot Diaz showcases the consequences of infidelity within a romantic relationship through the struggle of a Dominican man, Yunior, trying to fix his broken relationship while trying to reach self-understanding and accept the responsibilities for his actions. The title of this story makes the reader expect some great romance, but instead finds a story about harsh truth and reality. A writer commented on this story by saying, “The title alludes to subtle contradictions that appear in the story…Upon first glance at the title, the reader is apt to think that the story has a romantic or idyllic quality to it; for what is more charming than an image of the guiding lights of nature, the sun, moon, and stars? However, in the middle of the story, the narrator describes a failing relationship by declaring that the “relationship wasn’t the sun, the moon, and the stars” after all (Douglas Dupler pg. 21).” This just further showcases the idea of realism within the story. Junot Diaz weaves his tale through Yunior’s eyes. This first person point of view leads to a very one-sided recount of events. Yunior blames others, like Magda’s girlfriends, for his problems in his relationship with his girlfriend, Magda, claiming that he is a victim of circumstance and not a bad guy. Diaz furthers this through the use of stereotypes. For example, one man noted, “Diaz employs the stereotype of the femme fatale to underscore Yunior’s irresponsibility and to elucidate his macho tendencies. A femme fatale is a woman who is dangerously seductive and whose charms lead an unsuspecting man to ruin. Physically, Cassandra fits the stereotype, for Yunior describes her as “bella and negra,” a beautiful black
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Shayna Frances Gott period 6 woman with “a big chest and a smart mouth”… (Ira Mark Milne pg.15).” In addition, he also
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  • Summer '16
  • Trua
  • English Literature, Short story, First-person narrative, Magda, Yunior, Ira Mark Milne

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