module 3 notes.docx - Primary succession occurs after new...

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Primary succession occurs after new land is formed by a volcano or glacier, for example. Primary succession occurs in areas that contain no existing life. No soil is present in the ecosystem. Pioneer species , such as algae and fungi, are the first organisms to arrive. Few, if any, organisms are present initially and biodiversity increases over time. Secondary succession occurs after a severe disruption, such as a natural disaster, fire, or flood. Secondary succession occurs in areas following the removal of existing life. Some soil exists in the ecosystem. New organisms move in to build a new ecosystem. Biodiversity starts off low and increases over time. Polar Regions Ideal Season: Summer In polar regions there are plentiful nutrients. During the summer, the polar regions receive more sunlight, causing primary production to increase. Temperate Regions Ideal Season: Spring In temperate regions, primary production spikes in spring when there is an ideal amount of sunlight and nutrients. In the summer, the nutrient level decreases because of the spring activity. In the winter, primary production drops because there is less sunlight. Tropical Regions Ideal Season: Winter Despite the sunlight in the tropical regions, there is a limited amount of nutrients in general. Because of this, primary production is low all year until the winter season when upwelling near coastlines add nutrients, increasing production. Open system- energy and matter can move freely throughout the system. Closed system- energy and matter cannot leave the system. Isolated system-matter and energy cannot leave or enter the system. We can capture energy from the waves od the ocean from the surface . We can also Capture energy from tidal waves
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Crest The top part of a wave. In surfing, this is considered the most rideable part of a wave. Trough The bottom part of a wave. Surfers often start paddling during a trough in anticipation of the following crest. Equilibrium The point in the middle of a successive trough and crest. This is where surfers hang out waiting for the perfect wave. Amplitude The height of a wave as measured from the equilibrium to the crest or trough, or basically one half the wave height. Surfers often measure the height of a wave relative to their body, as in shoulder high or waist high.
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