1. Introduction (Feb 6).pptx - Five Branches of Philosophy...

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Five Branches of Philosophy 1) Epistemology: the study of knowledge. 2) Metaphysics: the study of the fundamental questions of reality (ontology- the study of being). 3) Logic: the study of argumentation and rationality. 4) Ethics: morality, politics, and living well. 5) Aesthetics: the study of beauty and sensation.
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Five Historical Periods of Western Philosophy 1) Ancient Philosophy (e.g., Socrates, Plato, Aristotle) 2) Medieval Philosophy – from roughly the 5 th century after the fall of Rome to the Renaissance in the 16 th century (e.g., Saint Augustine, Saint Anselm) 3) Modern Philosophy (e.g. Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant) 4) 19 th -Century Philosophy (e.g. Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche) 5) Contemporary Philosophy – Analytic and continental traditions from the 20 th and 21 st century (e.g. from the analytic tradition: Frege, Wittgenstein, and Russell; from the phenomenological tradition: Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau- Ponty, Levinas, and Sartre)
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Plato (around 427-347 BC) Main Themes Truth and reality Appearances Thinking without assumptions Readings The Republic (Allegory of the Cave, 514a- 520a)
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René Descartes (1596- 1650) Main Themes Method of Doubt Certainty of Knowledge Mind and Body Readings Meditations on First Philosophy
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John Locke (1632- 1704) Main themes: Indirect Realism Ideas and Qualities Arguments for the existence of things outside of us Readings An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
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George Berkeley (1685- 1753) Main Themes Berkeley’s Idealism Existence and Perception Readings Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous
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David Hume (1711- 1776) Main Themes The Primacy of Experience The Problem of Induction Readings An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
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Immanuel Kant (1724- 1804) Main Themes Transcendental Idealism Kant’s Copernican Revolution Readings The Critique of Pure Reason
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Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) Main Themes Phenomenology Intentionality Horizon Readings “Consciousness as Intentional Experience”
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Jean-Paul Sartre (1905- 1980) Main Themes Phenomenology Intentionality Readings “Intentionality: A Fundamental Idea of Husserl’s Phenomenology”
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Quentin Meillassoux (1967- ) Main Themes Speculative Realism Correlationalism Readings After Finitude
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Student Introductions 1) What is your name? 2) Where were you born? 3) What is your major (or what are your academic interests)? 4) What is your favorite hobby? (Or, say something interesting about yourself.)
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Plato Plato is one of the greatest Western philosophers of all time.
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