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Critical Analysis of The Communist Manifesto.docx

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Critical Analysis of “Communist Manifesto” by Karl Marx Submitted Class Date
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1 Karl Marx was born in 1818 in Germany to a Jewish lawyer, who later converted to Christianity leaving his Jewish status. His career in political writing is believed to have commenced in 1842, joining the democratic paper Die Rheinische Zeitung 1 . In the year 1843, Mark traveled to Paris, France, to acquire scholarly knowledge on socialism, so that he could protest legislation created by the Prussian Government. In 1848, Engels, Marx's intellectual partner, had built with Marx something called, The Communist Manifesto 23 . The principal works of Marx include Theses on Feuerbach , published in 1845, The German Ideology, published in 1846, The Critique of Political Economy which was published in 1859, and A Critique of the Gotha Programme, published in 1875. However, probably one of his more influential writings, The Communist Manifesto , takes the cake due to being one of the only books to elucidate the substantive features and hat laws that govern capitalism as a class-oriented social system. In the late 1920s, until World War II, the U.S was in a state of acute economic depression, the Great Depression. A large number of Americans across the states suffered skimpy clothing, malnutrition, and lacked shelter . Unemployment and hunger hit catastrophic levels and despair reigned. At the time, enrollment in the Labor Union dramatically rose as Americans searched for a significant panacea to the widespread economic problems they faced. It was during this time that some groups of people, hungry and without jobs, favorably considered Communism. Seemingly, these citizens craved for a utopian society, as they observed in the USSR, where everyone had a job and was cared for. Thus, communist parties arose everywhere; newspapers and literature in favor of Communism multiplied. 1 Vigor 1966, 11-16 2 Marx, Karl. The Communist Manifesto. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1988 3 Hunt 2009, 142-44
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2 Mark held a firm belief in the situation where the entire society is becoming more and more disunited and tended to split into two massive, hostile camps, into two broad divisions that directly face each other— Bourgeoisie and Proletariat ("Manifesto of the Communist Party" 1969, pp. 98-137)”. Marx explains that the Bourgeoisie as the social class that is above all while the Proletariat is the workers that provide/work below for the Bourgeoisie. During the time of founding the Communist Manifesto, the industrial revolution was coming into full swing. The Industrial Revolution of the 18 th and 19 th centuries gave the impression that more underclass workers were being created and were made to be permanently below the wealthy with little to no political representation. Of course, many people saw this as a build-up of a social disaster due to a larger growing lower class sinking deeper and deeper into poverty and working in severe conditions. Due to such a significantly lower level and feeling of being taken advantage of, Communism began to take off, although in its birth it had some criticisms.
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