PlanYourCommServProj-1.pdf

PlanYourCommServProj-1.pdf - Enthusiasm is contagious Start...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Planning Your Community Service Project Based on a Community Service-Learning Model “Enthusiasm is contagious. Start an epidemic.” - Don Ward.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Planning Your Community Service Project Michigan State University Extension 4-H Youth Development What is Community Service? “Cleaning up a river bank is service. Reading a book about environmental con- servation is learning. Youth reviewing results from wa- ter studies, presenting the scientific information to a pollution control agency and discussing the impact these results may have on future pollution control issues and our own behaviors is ser- vice-learning.” –Angelia Salas, 2006 4-H Teen Peer Mentoring and Service Learning training Five Steps to Community Service “Make a career of humanity and you will make a greater person of yourself, a great- er nation of your country, and a finer world to live in.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Follow these five easy steps and see for yourself that community service-learning can be fun! Step 1: Pick a project by determining needs. Brainstorm as a Group. Discuss prominent issues that need attention in your neighborhood and brainstorm ways to address the problems. Priori- tize your ideas and select the best one. Think about what you would like to learn from the project. Select From the News. Select stories that have emotional effects on your group. Discuss them together to select your project. Conduct a Survey. Survey members of the community to find out about their greatest concerns. Do a project about which the community residents feel strongly. Perhaps community members will be inspired to help with your project! Community Service Learning “Community service,” a well-known term in community programming, has its own definition: “the voluntary action of an individual or group of individuals without pay.” Examples of this type of service are conducting food drives, par- ticipating in adopt-a-highway programs, tutoring, teaching younger children, or raking leaves or shoveling snow for el- derly neighbors. It is action in the com- munity, involving community members – young people, adults and families – coming together to work on a common interest or community need. Combining the definition of community service and learning and putting it in the context of a community is what community-based service learning is all about. The Michigan Community Ser- vice Commission defines it as “activities that meet genuine community needs and require the application of knowl- edge, skills and reflection time.” To be effective it is important that youth are actively involved in the process. They should be engaged with assessing community needs, designing projects to address community needs, and reflecting before, during and after the service experience. In addition, service activities are designed to meet learning objectives, not just to “do service.” Successful community service- learning projects include the five steps listed below.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern