{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

5 - 1800-1865.pdf - Early National Expansion Use with...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Early National Expansion ( Use with America’s History , Chapters 7 thru 13 ) 1800-1865
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Western Expansion, 1787-1860 The Constitution provides for an orderly method of creating new, economically viable states West of the Appalachians The Louisiana Purchase (1803) doubles the size of the U.S. An economic symbiosis develops between the old Eastern states and the new mixed farming states above the Ohio River The Ohio River becomes the boundary between new “slave” (“Old Southwest”) and free labor ” (“Old Northwest”) states The rise of “King Cotton expands slavery in the South and accelerates free labor / anti-slavery sentiment in the North Bottom Line on pre-1860 Expansion: people move West first; new states then develop infrastructure to serve their needs
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How Territories Became States Initially, territory is unorganized Congress appoints judges and marshals A territory becomes organized when The territorial population reaches 5,000 and elects a legislature When the population reaches 60,000 the legislature writes a constitution and requests admission into the Union as a state New states thus escape dependency on old states
Image of page 4
Results of the Northwest Ordnances Above the Ohio River First territories to be “organized” Borders laid out Land surveyed for sale Slavery prohibited above the Ohio Results in admission of OH, ID, IL, MI, and WI into the Union as free states Below the Ohio River Temporarily placed under the control of VA, NC, SC To be laid out and surveyed later (in the 1810s) Slavery permitted, and will expand rapidly after 1820 Results in admission of KY, TN, AL, MS into the Union as slave states
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Breaching the Appalachian Barrier Western Migration after the Revolution Western Migration exploded after the British ceded the entire Ohio Valley to the United States Migrants and their descendants from the mid-Atlantic states generally remained above the Ohio River Migrants and their descendants from Virginia and the Carolinas moved West below the Ohio River The Ohio River thus served as a cultural border between slave and free states
Image of page 6
Indian Cessions and the Formation of New States Western migration created continuing pressure on Indian tribes to fight, and risk the destruction of their tribes and families, or migrate farther West themselves. After the Battle of Fallen Timbers and the Treaty of Greenville (1794-5) the Ohio Valley was effectively opened up to small farmers from Western New York and Pennsylvania.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern