Music in Society_ Final.pdf

Music in Society_ Final.pdf - Chris Giddings Music in...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chris Giddings Music in Society Collective Piracy Since the introduction of new technologies in the past few decades, the music industry has been forced to reinvent its means of sales and distribution several times. In today’s world, it is possible to listen to almost any song ever produced from the comfort of your home. The best part: it’s free. Before the creation of the Mp3, the only way a consumer could buy and listen to music was by purchasing an album or single at the local record store that contained roughly twelve songs. Consumers had no alternatives. This enabled record labels to regulate and monitor the sales of their content, and allowed them to stay in control of their product. In addition, the medium through which music was shared (vinyl, CD’s, etc.) was finite, and disabled consumers from circulating their purchased goods. This is not to say there was no illegal reproduction or sales of copyrighted songs, but it was a significantly more difficult process than it is today. Furthermore, the devices used to store music would slowly degrade over time when copied to a new disk. The implementation of these technologies in our society has played a major role in the development of the music industry. In this essay we will explore the effects on the industry and, more specifically, on artists resulting from technology and pirating. As technology started to become more integrated into our society, with it came curious programmers interested in making their mark. It was at this time that the
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
public became aware of the MP3 file format, and coders immediately took advantage of the opportunity. The MP3 allowed for audio to be transmitted between electronic devices, and was originally designed with no intention of facilitating the sharing of music. In the beginning, startup companies attempted to distribute these files through online databases in which individuals could store and access their music for free. This system would quickly be shot down by big name record labels after being labeled as pirating software, but would give rise to other companies with similar ideas of music distribution. These companies, such as Napster, would use a peer to peer file sharing system allowing users to access music on a random person’s hard drive and then download it. Just as before, record labels retaliated and would win their lawsuits.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern