{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Unicef mandates.docx - For over two decades UNICEF...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
For over two decades, UNICEF officials in Canada have consistently denied that their organization plays any part in disturbing contraceptives (most of which are abortifacient), or in promoting abortion or sterilization. Official records, however, tell a different story, and the history of UNICEF’s changes in policy shows just how far it has departed from its original mandate. To forestall UNICEF being attacked unjustly, it is necessary to make clear that the sources of information used here are UNICEF itself, other United Nations organizations, and pro-abortion groups such as the International Planned Parenthood Federation. One source which deals with UNICEF’s involvement in the “Population Debate” is Maggie Black’s The Children and the Nations: The story of UNICEF , published for UNICEF in 1986. The aftermath of World War II left many children across the world in dire straits, and UNICEF was called into being to deal with this emergency. This task UNICEF performed to world acclaim, as children (otherwise helpless) were provided with food, clean water, shelter and medical care. In 1950 the UN asked UNICEF to extend its work beyond emergency relief to the long-range needs of children. Un 1953 the name was changed to the United Nations Children’s Fund, but the term “UNICEF” was retained. The 1960s saw the resurrection of the old Malthusian theory of over-population leading the world to doom. Within the United Nations, there were references to “a new menace” which was blighted “the prospects of social and economic development in the Third World.” Life expectancy in the Third World had risen with the cure, control or elimination of diseases such as malaria, smallpox and yaws. Moreover, improved methods of communication and rapid transportation were cutting the death toll in disaster areas. This same period saw the development of new methods of fertility control: “The pill,” various IUDs and sterilization. Two groups, the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF were reluctant to join in the growing debate on fertility restraint. WHO’s reluctance was based on lack of knowledge about the health effects of the ‘pill’ and IUDs. UNICEF did not want to act before WHO, and was concerned with loss of financial support from its donors. However, the Bureau of Social Affairs within the UN was “behind the scenes” and “constantly trying to push both WHO and UNICEF in the family planning business.” Moreover, there was pressure within UNICEF itself. The
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern