GED11 - The GED Language Arts Reading Test Passing the GED...

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The GED Language Arts, Reading Test Passing the GED Language Arts, Reading Test Jean Dean ABE/GED Teacher Mentor Teacher California Distance Learning Project www.cdlponline.org 1
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GED Video Partner #11 Passing the GED Reading Test In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. Martin Luther King, Jr. TEST OVERVIEW: Time: 65 minutes The test consists of fiction and nonfiction readings. Fiction excerpts include readings from novels, short stories, folk tales, poetry, and plays. Nonfiction excerpts include readings from reviews, essays, articles, speeches, biographies, business documents, and articles about the visual arts. The test consists of 40 multiple-choice questions. 30 of the questions come from fiction readings. 10 of the questions come from nonfiction readings. There are seven passages. Three of the passages are from prose fiction (novels, short stories, and folk tales). Poetry and plays have one passage each. Nonfiction has two passages. There are three literary time periods. One passage comes from each of these periods: Before 1920 1920-1960 After 1960 The following reading skills are tested: Comprehension—identifying the main idea, the purpose of a selection, supporting details, and using context clues to discover the meaning of unknown words 2
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Application—applying ideas to a new context Analysis—recognizing the way material is organized, including identifying inferences, figurative language, and knowing an author’s style or tone Synthesis—combining understanding of passage with extra information you bring to the passage, looking at an author’s style, tone, point of view, and purpose The number of questions you answer in each reading skill area is as follows: Comprehension 8 questions Application 6 questions Analysis 12-14 questions Synthesis 12-14 questions All readings have a purpose question at the beginning of the reading. Read this question to acquaint yourself with the topic. You do not have to answer this question. Rather, use it as a guide to focus on as you read the excerpt. SCORING All your correct answers are counted. You are not penalized for wrong answers. Therefore, do not leave any blanks. Eliminate the obviously wrong choices, and give an educated try to determine the correct answer. The scoring center converts your raw score (total number of right answers) to a three- digit standard score. In California you must have a standard score of 410 or higher to pass the reading test. 3
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Video 11 Focus: what the test is and how to prepare for it You Will Learn From Video 11: How to answer comprehension, application, analysis and synthesis questions. How to analyze fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama readings.
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