GED12 - The GED Language Arts Reading Test Nonfiction Jean...

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The GED Language Arts, Reading Test Nonfiction Jean Dean ABE/GED Teacher Mentor Teacher California Distance Learning Project 1
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#12 est GED Video Partner Passing the GED Reading T I’ve never known any trouble that an hour’s reading didn’t assuage. Charles De Secondat (1689-1755) Video 12 Focus: how to successfully read nonfiction material You Will Learn From Video 12: That nonfiction writing is about real people and real happenings. How to read nonfiction material including passages from newspapers, magazines, speeches, biographies, and business documents. How to determine the main idea from supporting details. How to distinguish factual statements from opinions. Words You Need to Know: While viewing the video, put the letter of the meaning by the correct vocabulary word. Answers are on page 17. _____1. nonfiction a. a column in a newspaper that material states the opinion of an editor _____2. table of contents, b. a piece of information shown index, glossary to be true _____3. fact c. a personal judgment _____4. opinion d. useful tools for finding _____5. editorial information in be. e. factual material: abusiness letter, assembly instructions, or a biography Points to Remember: In daily life you regularly use nonfiction reading skills to learn new ideas, to problem- solve, and to understand written communication. Pleasure reading, such as biographies, reviews, and editorials, help you to read nonfiction passages. Learn to recognize a writer’s facts from his opinions by reading the editorial page of your local newspaper. 2
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Nonfiction prose, or writing in paragraph form, consists of writing that is about real people, real events, and real social situations. The reading passages present factual information or an author’s viewpoint. On the GED Reading Test, you will read and analyze two nonfiction prose passages. There will be about ten questions to answer. THE PURPOSE QUESTION: WHAT IT IS, WHERE IT IS FOUND, AND WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS READ IT At the beginning of every reading is a question. The purpose of the question is to give a reason for reading the material. Use this question to focus your reading. You are not required to answer this question. It is given only to help you concentrate on the ideas presented in the excerpt. Here is a typical purpose question: HOW DID DEATH VALLEY GET ITS NAME? Now as you read the following paragraph, focus on the above question. In Death Valley in the United States is the lowest and hottest spot in the country. This valley, located in California near the Nevada border, is 282 feet below sea level. It is not uncommon for temperatures to reach 125 degrees. A record of 134 degrees for the nation was recorded in 1931. Its grim name was given by a group of gold seekers in 1849. The two areas from which nonfiction prose comes are: Informational Nonfiction: business documents, research reports, newspapers, magazines, and speeches Literary Nonfiction: letters, diaries, memoirs, essays, and biographies; commentaries on
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