Anthro33_Midterm_Study_Guide (1).doc - Anthro 33 Spring...

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Anthro 33 - Spring 2013 Midterm Study Guide WHAT TO STUDY: -> Below is a list of concepts covered in the class. You should be able to 1) explain them, 2) connect them to each other, 3) give examples (from readings/lecture) if relevant. -> Also know the authors of the assigned readings and what studies they are associated with (you do not need to know the years or the names of people who are cited within the articles). Study Tip : Re-organize this list so that all the related concepts are grouped together, then learn the whole batch of them Test-Taking Tips: Answer all easy questions first, then go back to the difficult ones. Look at how many points each question is worth and balance your time accordingly (so don’t spend half the exam on a 2 point question.) IN THE EXAM: -> Bring pens (no pencils). You will not use blue-books, notes or any other materials. -> The exam format may include: short (2-3 sentence) explanations, short (1 page or less) essays, fill- in-the-blank, definitions, matching. -> Be clear and explicit. In an exam the grader cannot guess at your meaning -- we can only grade what you actually write. -> Read and follow instructions. If you have a choice of questions (e.g. “Define 4 out of 6 terms”), answer only the number of questions indicated. Key Terms: Conversation analysis Focus on everyday speech. Transition relevance point (TRP) Where another speaker comes in Turn / turn construction unit (and know the difference) Turn: 1 person speaking and the other person has not. A is talking B is not TCU: Everything between TRP is a TCU (every sentence) Gaps vs. overlap in conversation Gap: pause between speakers Overlap: Cutting someone off and starts new sentence before other person finishes Adjacency pairs Question & Answer; Greeting & Response (i.e. how’s it going? Good) African-American English Different perspectives on it by members of the African American community A form of English spoken by many African Americans, particularly among those of rural or urban working-class backgrounds; Also known as Ebonics Morgan Article Blacks being placed in lower level classes b/c of AAE. AAE is a dialect w/ its own rules
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Different views on AAE (African American identity; symbol of resistance vs. indication of a slave mentality) Code-switching Switching between different languages i.e. English and Spanish (Homegirls switching between English and Spanish when telling stories) Asking a question in English and getting a response in Spanish Int ra -sentential (words within a sentence) Int er -sentential (words between sentences) Grammatical types Thematic Code-Switching: Code-switching based on task or addressee (school activity in English, chatting with friends in Spanish) Quotative Code-Switching: Describing a conversation in language in which it occurred (done for accuracy) Emblematic language use (and code-switching) Emblematic Code-Switching: Use of single words in secondary language Reasons for doing it Establishing cultural connection; identify yourself by code switching Who typically does it?
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  • Spring '08
  • Wertheim
  • speech community

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