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Unformatted text preview: IRC:112-2011 CODE OF PRACTICE FOR CONCRETE ROAD BRIDGES ( Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2014 https://archive.org/details/govlawircy201 1112 IRC:112-2011 CODE OF PRACTICE FOR CONCRETE ROAD BRIDGES Published by: INDIAN ROADS CONGRESS Kama Koti Marg, Sectors, R.K. Puram, New Delhi -110 022 NOVEMBER - 2011 Price (Packing ^ 1000 & postage charges extra) IRC:112-2011 First Published November, 2011 Reprinted December, 2012 Reprinted June, 2014 ( Incorporating all Amendments and Errata Published upto June, 2014) (All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, transmitted in translated or any form or by any means without the permission of the Indian Roads Congress) (The Official amendments to this document which may be considered necessary from time to time would be published by the IRC in its periodical Indian Highways These shall be considered as effective and as part of the Code etc. from the date specified therein) Printed at: India Offset Press, (1000 Copies) New Delhi IRC:112-2011 PERSONNEL OF THE BRIDGES SPECIFICATIONS AND STANDARDS COMMITTEE (As on 1. 2. 3. 25"^ October 2010) & Sinha.A.V. Director General (RD) (Convenor) Road Transport & Highways, New Delhi Puri.S.K. Add!. Director General, Minstry of Road Tansport & (Co-Convenor) Highways, New Delhi Chief Engineer (B) S&R, Ministry of Road Transport Sharma.Arun Kumar (Member- Secretary) Spl. Secretary, Ministry of & Highways, New Delhi Members 4. Agan/val, 5. CPWD, Ghaziabad STUP Consultants Director General (W) (Retd.), K.N. Alimchandani, C.R. Chairman & Managing Director, 6. Banerjee, A.K. Mumbai Member (Tech.), 7. Banerjee, T.B. Chief Engineer (Retd.), Ministry of Ltd., (Retd.) & Highways, New 8. Basa, Ashok New Delhi NHAI. Road Transport Delhi Director (Tech.), B. Engineers & Builders Ltd., Bhubaneswar 9. Bandyopadhyay, Dr. T.K. Joint Director General (Retd.), Institute for Steel Dev. and Growth, Kolkata 10. 11. Bandyopadhyay, Bongirwar, PL. Dr. N. STUP Consultants Ltd., Director, Mumbai (Retd.) MOST, New ADG (B) 13. Chakraborty, Prof. S.S. Managing Pvt. Ltd., 15. Dhodapkar.A.N. 16. Gupta, 17. Mahesh Ghoshal.A. New Delhi Advisor, L&T, 12. Bhasin, P.C. 14. Chakrabarti, S.P. (P) Ltd. Delhi Director, Consulting New Consultant. Engg. Services Delhi Span Consutants (P) Ltd., Chief Engineer (Retd.), Ministry of Highways, New Delhi Executive Director (B&S), Director (I) Noida Road Transport & RDSO, Lucknow and Vice-President, STUP Consulants Ltd., Kolkata 18. Joglekar, S O. Director (Engg. Core), STUP Consultants Ltd., Mumbai 19. Kand, Dr. C.V. 20. Koshi, Ninan MP PWD, Bhopal Director General (RD) &Addl. Secy., MOST (Retd.), Chief Engineer, (Retd.), Gurgaon 21. Kumar, Prafulla Director General (RD) & AS (Retd.), MORT&H. Noida 22. Kumar, Vijay 23. Kumar, Dr. Ram UP PWD, Noida Chief General Manager, NHAI, New Delhi E-in-C (Retd.), IRC:112-2011 24. Kumar, Ashok Chief Engineer, Ministry of Highways., New Delhi Director, Freyssinet 25. Manjure, P.Y. Road Transport & Prestressed Concrete Co. Ltd., Mumbai 29. Patankar.V.L. MORT&H. New Delhi Director General (RD) & AS (Retd.), MORT&H, Chief Engineer (Retd.), MORT&H, New Delhi Member (Tech.), NHAI. New Delhi 30. Rajagopalan, Dr. N. Chief Technical Advisor, L&T, Chennai 31. Raina, Dr. V.K. B-13, Sector-14, Noida-201301 (UP) 32. Rao. M.V.B. A-181 Sarita Vihar, 33. Roy, Dr. B.C. Executive Director, Consulting Engg. Services Chief Engineer (Retd 26. Mukherjee, M.K. 27. Narain, A.D 28. Ninan, R.S. , Pvt. Ltd., 34. Sharma, R.S. New Mahesh Velayutham, Director, Delhi & SS. (Retd.), MORT&H, & SS, (Retd.), MORT&H, Tandon Consultants New PB. Diretor&Head (P) Ltd., & SS, (Retd.), MORT&H, Delhi (W) (Retd.),CPWD, New Delhi 40. Vijay, Director General 41. Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi Directorate General Border Roads, New Delhi 42. Addl. Director General EX'Officio 1 . Ltd., Delhi Director General (RD) V. (I) Delhi Mumbai Managing New 39. New Exeutive Director, Construma Consultants (P) Dr. G.P. 38. Tandon, Prof. Delhi Delhi Director General (RD) 36. Sinna, N.K. Noida Delhi Director General (RD) New Saha. New Past Secretary General, IRC. 35. Sharan, G. 37. New ), Members Liansanga, Engineer-in-Chief and Secretary, President, IRC PWD, 2. Director Spl. 3. General (RD) Secretary Secretary General & Mizoram, Aizawl (Sinha, A.V.) Ministry of Road Trasport Highways, New Delhi (Indoria, R.P) Indian Roads Congress, New Delhi & Corresponding Members 1. Merani, N.V. Principal Secretary (Retd.), Maharashtra PWD, Mumbai 2. Bagish, Dr. B.R C-2/2013, Opp. D.PS., Vasant Kunj. (ii) New Delhi IRC:112-2011 SECTION CONTENTS 1 Page No. Section Contents -' 1 Personnel of the Bridges Specifications and Standards Committee (i) Section 2 Introductiori 1 Section 3 Definitions 3.1 Terms and 3.2 Notations 3 3 Definitions Section 4 11 ' General 4.1 Scope 4.2 Underlying Assumptions Sections Aims and Notations 16 16 • Basis of Design \, 16 - 18 18 19 5.2 Design Limit State Philosophy of Design 5.3 Limit States 20 5.4 Actions and their Combinations 21 5.5 Representative Values of Properties of Materials 5.6 Analytical 23 24 25 25 5.1 of • 5.7 Methods to Evaluate Behaviour of Structures Design Based on Full Scale Testing 5.8 Durability Aspects Section 6 ' Material Properties and their Design Values 28 6.1 General 6.2 Untensioned Steel Reinforcement 28 28 6.3 Prestressing Steel 31 6.4 Concrete 35 Section 7 Analysis " 7.3 General Provisions Analyses for Serviceability Limit States Analyses for Ultimate Limit States 7.4 Torsional Effects 7.5 7.6 Combined Global and Local Effects Structures and Structural Frames 7.7 Composite Concrete Construction 7.1 7.2 50 . (iii) ' 50 53 54 55 55 55 58 IRC:112-2011 7.8 Structural Effects of Time-Dependent Properties of 7.9 Prestressed 7.10 Design and Detailing 7.11 Special Load Transferring Devices Members and 8.2 Scope Strain and Stress 8.3 Biaxial 9.2 9.3 9.4 Curved Tendons 66 68 Thin Sections Ultimate Limit State of Two and Three Dimensional Elements for Out of Plane and in Plane Loading Effects Scope 10.2 10.4 Design of Flexural Members for Shear Design Method Design for Punching Shear 10.5 Torsion General- 11.2 Simplified Slenderness Criteria 11.3 Non-linear Analysis of Structure and Elements 11.4 Lateral Instability of Slender Section 12 Elements 80 80 80 85 98 105 Ultimate Limit State of Induced Deformation 11.1 110 110 ^' ;• ' Beam Serviceability Limit State 76 76 76 76 77 Ultimate Limit State of Shear, Punching Shear and Torsion 10.1 Section 11 Shell 69 69 69 73 Distribution at Ultimate Limit State Scope One-Way and Two-Way Slabs and Walls Sub-elements of Box Structures General Solution for Two-Way Slabs, Walls and Section 10 10.3 in Bending Section 9 9.1 61 Structures Ultimate Limit State of Linear Elements for Bending and Axial Forces Section 8 8.1 for 60 Concrete 111 115 118 12C 12.1 General 12.2 Stress Limitation 120 120 12.3 Limit State of Cracking 121 12.4 Limit State of Deflection 131 Section 13 13.1 1 3.2 Prestressing Systems General Anchorages for Post Tensioning Systems (iv) 133 133 1 33 IRC:112-2011 13.5 Mechanical Couplers Sheathing Ducts andJoints End Block Design and Detailing 13.6 Protective Grouting 13.7 Protection of Post Tensioned 13.3 13.4 Tendons and Anchorages 134 134 136 138 139 Durability 140 14.1 General 14.2 Common Mechanisms Leading to the 140 140 14.3 Design 14.4 Additional Provisions for Specific Section 14 Deterioration of Concrete Structures 141 for Durability Detailing: General Section 15 15.1 General 15.2 Reinforcing Steel 15.3 Prestressing Units 15.4 Coated Steels Mechanisms of Deterioration Requirements 147 147 147 162 169 Detailing Requirements of Structural Section 16 144 Members 171 16.1 General 16.2 Columns 16.3 R.C. Walls and Wall Type Piers 16.4 Hollow Piers/Columns 16.5 Beams 173 174 175 16.6 Solid Slabs 181 16.7 Corbels 16.8 Articulations 16.14 Anchorage Zones for Post Tensioning Forces 185 186 186 1 87 187 189 190 190 Section 17 192 171 171 of Solid Section Deep Beams 16.10 Members with Unbonded Tendons 16.9 16.11 Concentrated Forces 16.12 Forces Associated with Change in Direction 16.13 Indirect Supports 17.1 17.2 17.3 Ductile Detailing for Seismic Resistance General Concrete Piers/Columns Foundations Section 18 192 192 199 Materials, Quality Control 18.1 General 18.2 Untensioned Stee! and Workmanship 200 200 200 (V) IRC:112-2011 18.3 1 8.4 Material Ingredients of Concrete 1 8.5 Mix Proportions of Concrete 18.6 Acceptance 18.7 Grouting 1 8.8 202 205 209 212 214 216 Prestressing Steel Criteria Quality Control and Workmanship Normative Annexu res A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 and Combination of Actions Additional Information and Data about Properites of Concrete and List of Standards and other Normative References Structural Design by "Working Loads/Allowable Stresses Method" Actions, Design Situations Steel 229 235 246 251 Informative Annexures B-1 Concrete Shell Elements B-2 B-3 Mechanisms of Deterioration of Concrete Structures Effect of Live Loads on Deck Slabs (vi) . 268 275 278 IRC:112-2011 SECTION The Design 2 INTRODUCTION Prestressed Concrete Road Bridges (Post-Tensioned Concrete); Criteria for IRC: 18 and Standard Specification and Code of Practice for Road Bridges Section ill, Cement Concrete (Plain and Reinforced); IRC: 21, both based on working stress method, were first published in December 1 965 and October 1 966 respectively. The last revisions of these two documents were carried out in the year 2000. These two codes stands withdrawn on publication of this Code. The past two decades have seen unprecedented growth of knowledge in the field of concrete bridges, development of new structural forms, new methods of computer-based analysis and design and development of high strength materials. The need for a new rationalized code for bridge structures with international practices, has been in general, based felt for on the limit state approach, a long time. Keeping this in a new code based on the Limit State Method, was taken up writing Concrete (Plain, in line view, the task of in 2001 by the Reinforced and Prestressed) Structures Committee (B-4) and continued over several terms of the Committee. The present composition of the Committee follows: . Convenor Co-convenor Member-Secretary Koshi, Ninan Mukherjee, M.K. Viswanathan, T Members Bhowmick, Alok Kurian, Bhide. D.A. Mullick, Dr.A.K. Goel, Dr. Rajeev Mittal, Gupta, Vinay Patankar, V.L. Heggade, V.N. Rajeshirke, U.K. Joglekar, S.G. Sharma, Aditya Jose Dr.A.K. Vaidya, Avinash Corresponding Member Haridas, Ex-officio President, G.R Members DG(RD) & SS. IRC (A.V, Sinha) (Liansanga) Secretary General, IRC (R.P. Indoria) 1 MORT&H is as IRC:112-2011 The task of drafting and finalization of the new Code of Practice for Concrete Road Bridge was completed by the B-4 Committee in September 201 0. The draft was approved by the Bridges Specifications and Standards Committee at its meeting held at New Delhi on 25^^ October 2010 and later by the Executive Committee on 27^^ October 2010. The draft was discussed and approved by the Council of the Indian Roads Congress at the 1 92"^ Council Meeting held at Nagpur on 1 2'^ November 201 0. The object of issuing the new Code of Practice for Concrete Road Bridges is to establish a common procedure for design and construction of road bridges in India based on the limit state method. This publication is meant to serve as a guide to both design and construction engineers, but compliance with the provisions therein does not relieve them, in any way, of the responsibility for the stability, soundness, durability and safety of the structures designed and constructed by them. The design and construction of road bridges require an extensive and thorough knowledge of the science and technology involved and should be entrusted only to specially qualified engineers with adequate experience of bridge engineering, capable of ensuring correct design and execution of bridge works. 2 IRC:112-2011 SECTION 3.1 Terms and 3.1.1 Terms 3 DEFINITIONS AND NOTATIONS Definitions relating to structure Structure Organised combination of connected parts designed adequate rigidity. Structural to carry loads Member Physically distinguishable part of a structure, e.g. a column, a foundation pile. Structural System Assemblage members of load-bearing members of a structure beam, a and the way in slab, a which these function together. Structural Model Idealisation of the structural and and provide system used for the purposes of analysis, design verification. 3.1.2 Terms relating to design Actions Refer 3.1.3 Resistance Capacity of a member or component, or a cross-section of a member or component of a structure, to withstand actions without mechanical failure e.g. bending resistance, buckling resistance, tension resistance. Strength Mechanical property of a material indicating units of stress, or magnitude of action. 3 its ability to resist actions, usually given In IRC:112-2011 Reliability a structure or a structural Ability of including the design working expressed in probabilistic life for member which it to fulfil the specified requirements has been designed. Reliability is usually terms. Design Criteria Quantitative formulations that describe the conditions to be fulfilled for each limit state. Design Situations Sets of physical conditions representing the real conditions occurring during a certain time interval for which the design will demonstrate that relevant limit states are not exceeded. ReferAnnexureA-1. Transient Design Situation Design situation that working Note: life A is relevant during a period of the structure much and which has a high shorter than the design probability of occurrence. transient design situation refers to temporary conditions of the structure, of use or exposure, e.g. during construction or repair. Persistent Design Situation Design situation that working Note: life is relevant during a period of the same order as the design of the structure. Generally it refers to conditions of normal use. Accidental Design Situation Design situation involving exceptional conditions of the structure or including fire, its exposure, explosion, impact or local failure. Seismic Design Situation Design situation involving exceptional conditions of the structure when subjected to a seismic event. 4 IRC:112-2011 Design Working Life/Design Life period for which a structure or part cf it is to be used for purpose with anticipated maintenance but without necessity of major repair. Assumed its intended Load Arrangement Identification of the position, magnitude and direction of a free action. Load Case Compatible load arrangements, sets of considered simultaneously with fixed/variable deformations and imperfections actions and permanent actions for a particular verification. Limit States States beyond which the structure no longer fulfills the relevant design criteria. Ultimate Limit States States associated with collapse or with other similar forms of structural failure. Note: These generally correspond to the maximum load-carrying resistance of a structure or structural member. Serviceability Limit States States that correspond to conditions beyond which specified service requirements for a structure or structural member are no longer met. Irreversible Serviceability Limit States where some consequences of actions exceeding the requirements will remain when the actions are removed. Serviceability limit states specified service Reversible Serviceability Limit States where no consequences of actions exceeding the requirements will remain when the actions are removed. Serviceability limit states specified service Serviceability Criterion Design criterion for a serviceability limit state. 5 ) IRC:112-2011 Terms 3.1 .3 relating to actions (Also refer Annexure A-1 Action (F) (a) Set offerees (loads) applied (b) Set of imposed deformations or accelerations caused to the structure (direct action); for example, by temperature changes, moisture variation, uneven settlement or earthquakes (indirect action). Effectof Action fHj Effect of actions (or action effect) on structural moment, stress, strain) or Permanent Action on the whole structure variation magnitude with time the internal force, (e.g. deflection, rotation). act throughout a given reference period is in (e.g. fGJ Action that in members, likely to same direction (monotonic) negligible, or for is until and for which the variation the action attains a certain limit which the is always value. Variable Action CQJ Action for which the variation in magnitude with time is neither negligible nor monotonic. Accidental Action (A) Action usually of short duration, but of significant magnitude, that given structure dunng the design Note: An may rarely occur on a life. accidental action can be expected in some cases to cause severe global consequences on structures unless appropriate measures such as provision alternative load path are taken. Seismic Action (A^) Action that arises due to earthquake ground motions. Geotechnical Action Action transmitted to the structure by the ground, 6 fill or groundwater. of IRC:112-2011 Fixed Action Action that has a fixed distribution and position over the structure or structural mennber such that the magnitude and direction of the action are determined unambiguously for the whole structure or structural member point if this magnitude and direction are determined at one on the structure or structural member. Free Action Action that may have various spatial distributions over the structure. Single Action Action that can be assumed to be statistically independent in time and space of any other acton acting on the structure. Static Action Action that does not cause significant acceleration of the structure or structural members. Dynamic Action Action that causes significant acceleration of the structure or structural members. Quasi-static Action Dynamic action represented by an equivalent static action in a static model. Characteristic Value of an Action ("F^ Principal representative value of Note: (1 ) an action considered in the design process. Insofar as a characteristic value can be fixed on statistical basis; it is chosen so as to correspond to a prescribed probability of not being exceeded on the unfavourable side during a 'reference period' taking into account the design working (2) In life absence of the structure and the duration of the design situation. of data for arriving at value as per conceptually performs the same ) a nominal value is used which function as that of characteristic value but not associated with any probability number. 7 (1 is . IRC:112-2011 Nominal Value Value fixed on non-statistical bases, for instance, on acquired experience or on physical conditions, which may be used in place of characteristic value. Reference Period Chosen period of time that is used as a basis for assessing Combination Value of a Variable Action (v|/ statistically variable actions. ' ,^^) Value chosen, insofar as it can be fixed on statistical basis, so that the probability that the effects caused by the combination will be exceeded is approximately the same as by the characteristic value of an individual action. It may be expressed as a determined part of the characteristic value by using a factory^ </. • s. Frequent Value of a Variable Action can be (h/,(2k) on statistical basis, so that either the total time, within the reference period, during which is exceeded is only a small given part of the reference period, or the frequency of it being exceeded is limited to a given value. It may be expressed as a determined part of the characteristic value by using a factor v|/,<l Value determined, insofar as it fixed it Quasi-Permanent Value of a Variable Action ( y/j^J Value of a variable action as a fraction of characteristic load, which substantial part of the ...
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