Tetrahymena lab.pdf - Lok Cheng Lab Report Lab 2...

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Lok Cheng Lab Report Lab 2 3/20/18 Investigating the effect of Bead Size on endocytosis in Tetrahymena Introduction: Tetrahymena is a Protozoan eukaryotic ciliate which feeds through phagocytosis by ingesting extracellular material. These ciliates are usually found in freshwater ponds, streams and lakes, however, they can also tolerate living in diverse environments. Tetrahymena not only utilize their cilia located around their membrane to promote movement but to also sweep food into their cell where phagocytosis occurs. They generally eat bacteria, small cells and organic debris. (Coyne, Robert S.) The biological process that will be used in this experiment is Microscopy Assay. Microscopy Assay is an experimental technique which will be used in this experiment where we will utilize a microscope to observe, count and record the number of beads the small living ciliate Tetrahymena engulfs into itself. Our first initial observations when we did our first experiment were that the Tetrahymena ingests 3 um large blue polystyrene microbeads. In addition to that, we also managed to observe that multiple beads may be consumed by the same Tetrahymena and that they use their cilia to grab onto the beads. We also observed that the Tetrahymena have erratic movement and generally moves from side to side, randomly. According to table 1, in our first Table 1: Raw Data collected in the first experiment where we observed the number of 3um beads ingested by Tetrahymena .
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experiment, we observed that the Tetrahymena ingest 2-26 3 um beads. On average, they ingest around 7.7 3 um beads in a single Tetrahymena. Knowing this information is relevant for our experiment as we now know for a fact that Tetrahymena will definitely ingest the 3 um large micro beads allowing for it to serve as our positive control. It also tells us that the Tetrahymena used in our experiment are not defective/dead and are capable of ingesting beads as a source of food. In our next experiment, we will be using the same biological process to observe Tetrahymena behavior underneath a microscope and observe whether or not they are capable of ingesting various sizes of beads. I hypothesize that if Tetrahymena are offered a range of micro bead sizes, then they will show a preference towards the smaller beads. The reasoning behind this is because we believe that their Cilia will have a larger effect when sweeping micro beads into oral groove if the beads are smaller. In addition, smaller beads may be easier to ingested compared to larger beads. Moreover, considering that Tetrahymena
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