Wines of Italy - A.pdf - Wines of Italy The Wines of Italy...

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2/19/18 1 The Wines of Italy HMGT 4300 Survey of Beverages Wines of Italy More wine produced than any other countries Biggest net exporter to U.S. 1.2 million growers Close proximity to ocean Over 80% of the land is mountains or hilly Dramatic range of micro-climates Map of Italian Wine Regions Italy One of the most prolific, historic, and important wine-producing countries. One of the largest consumers and exporters of wine in the world. Number two producer of wine in the world . Average of 20 gallons of wine consumed per person per year. Making wine for over 4,000 years. Wine is seen as a part of food in Italy thus becoming a part of their sustenance and therefor an integral part of Italians lives. The Facts on Italy Climate: A large peninsula jutting south from the continent into the Mediterranean, Italy is home to several climate zones. Conditions range widely from alpine in the north to near desert conditions in the south. Extensive latitudinal range of the county permits wine growing from the Alps in the north to almost-within-sight of Africa in the south. The fact that Italy is a peninsula with a long shoreline contributes moderating climate to coastal wine regions. Extensive mountains and foothills provide many altitudes for grape growing and a variety of climate and soil conditions. Top Regions Classic Regions: Piedmont, Tuscany (Toscano),and Veneto Important Regions: o Northwestern Italy: Emilia-Romagna, Liguria, Lombardy, Valle d’Aosta o Northeastern Italy: Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige o Central Italy: Abruzzo, Latium, The Marches, Molise, Umbria o Southern Italy and The Islands: Apulia, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Sardinia, Sicily
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2/19/18 2 Wine Law Information Created in the 1960’s Denominazione di Origine Controlla ( DOC ) was introduced as the first successful attempt at regulating wine production in Italy. There are four classifications of Italian wines that get stricter and more prestigious as you transition from level to level with DOCG being at the top and vino da tavola ( Table wine) being at the bottom. Similar to Frances AOC law system, DOC directly translates to Appellation d’Origine Controlee. Italian Wine Classification System 1. DOCG 2. DOC 3. IGT o Grape varieties can be labeled o Places of origin are not allowed on the label 4. VdT o Lowest level, greatest amount of freedom. o Grape, geographical designation, and vintage are not allowed on label Italian Wine Laws Italian Wine Laws Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garanita ( DOCG ): Strictest and top quality classification, only a select few appellations.
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