CTL1307F_IDENTITY_CONSTRUCTION_AND_ED._OF_MINORITIES.doc

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CTL1307F IDENTITY CONSTRUCTION AND (EDU5169) EDUCATION OF MINORITIES DEPARTMENT of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Fall 2012 Monday, 5pm - 8.00pm Diane Gérin-Lajoie, Ph.D. Office: 6 – 109; telephone: 416-978-1993 [email protected] Appointment hours: on request The course is designed to study the contradictory role of the school as an agent of linguistic and cultural reproduction in a school system where students are from diverse racial, ethnic, linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The dichotomy majority - minorities will be analysed closely. The course will examine how school, through its curriculum - official and hidden - contributes to the students’ identity construction and its effects on the ways that students perceive themselves in relation to their own groups and to others, in other words, where they belong. In the context of the course, identity will be understood as being the result of a social construction. Identity is not, then, something given at birth, but is rather embedded in daily social practices. Identity construction is a dynamic process which is influenced by the power relations in which this process evolves. Students will first analyse key-concepts such as identity, ethnicity, minority, race, whiteness, culture and language. The process of identity construction will then be examined within the Canadian context, where the Ontario education scene will be the focus of study. Students will look at the ways this institution contributes to the process of identity construction of the school population. Special attention will be devoted to the notion of bilingual identity and its impact on minorities’ linguistic and culture retention. In other words, can bilingual identity exist in itself, or if it constitutes instead, the first step in the process of complete assimilation to the majority group? Topics and required readings A series of mandatory readings will be made available to the students at the beginning of the semester. In addition to those readings, the following book will also be used: Gérin-Lajoie, D. (ed.). 2008. Educators' Discourses on Student Diversity In Canada: Context, Policy, and Practice. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. 1
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Copies of the book can be purchased at Bob Miller Book Room, 180 Bloor Street West, Lower Concourse in Toronto. Store hours: Monday to Friday 9am-6pm and Saturday 10am-5pm Weekly Sessions The course will be divided into sessions where specific topics will be discussed. To make the sessions productive, students are requested to come to class prepared . Readings must be done on time in order for everybody to contribute to each session. We should normally cover one topic a week. Some of the topics might take more time than planned, in which case we will adjust our schedule accordingly. The topics and their related readings are the following: September 10 Introduction to the course . Course outline presentation . Initial discussion on the identity construction process and the role of the school in this process September 17 The concept of identity 2
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Readings: Hall, S. (2006) “The future of Identity”, in S.P. Hier and B.Singh Bolaria
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